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Thermoenergetics of pre-moulting and moulting kookaburras (Dacelo novaeguineae): they're laughing.

Buttemer, W.A., Nicol, S.C. and Sharman, A. 2003, Thermoenergetics of pre-moulting and moulting kookaburras (Dacelo novaeguineae): they're laughing., Journal of comparative physiology B : biochemical, systemic, and environmental physiology, vol. 173, no. 3, pp. 223-230, doi: 10.1007/s00360-003-0326-z.

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Title Thermoenergetics of pre-moulting and moulting kookaburras (Dacelo novaeguineae): they're laughing.
Formatted title Thermoenergetics of pre-moulting and moulting kookaburras (Dacelo novaeguineae): they're laughing.
Author(s) Buttemer, W.A.
Nicol, S.C.
Sharman, A.
Journal name Journal of comparative physiology B : biochemical, systemic, and environmental physiology
Volume number 173
Issue number 3
Start page 223
End page 230
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2003-04
ISSN 0174-1578
1432-136X
Keyword(s) kookaburras
basal metabolism
moult energetics
thermoregulation
body temperature
Summary We examined the effect of temperature on resting metabolic rate in seven field-captured laughing kookaburras (Dacelo novaeguineae) during late winter and early spring. Basal metabolic rate averaged 201±3.4 ml O2 h–1 (0.603 ml O2 g–1 h–1). Overall thermal conductance (Ko) declined with ambient temperature (Ta) and averaged 0.026 ml O2 g–1 h–1 °C–1 at Tas<10 °C. Day-night differences in body temperatures (2.6 °C) and in alpha-phase versus rho-phase minimum metabolic rates were much greater (33%) than predicted for 340-g nonpasserine birds and suggest that these animals operate as low-metabolic intensity animals in their rest phase, but normal-metabolic intensity animals during their active phase. Metabolic rate was measured in four of the same birds undergoing moult. Thermal conductance increased to 60% above pre-moult values about 6 weeks after moult began. Basal metabolic rate of moulting birds showing peak thermal conductance readings averaged 17 ml O2 h–1 higher than pre-moult measurements. Although this increase was not statistically significant, we believe the moult costs of kookaburras are too low to overcome the inherent variability of BMR determination. We suggest that moult costs of kookaburras are only somewhat higher than the measured costs of protein synthesis of other endotherms.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00360-003-0326-z
Field of Research 060806 Animal Physiological Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2003, Springer-Verlag
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020869

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