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Greening Australian workplaces : workers and the environment

Lambropoulos, Victoria 2009, Greening Australian workplaces : workers and the environment, Alternative law journal, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 189-192.

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Title Greening Australian workplaces : workers and the environment
Author(s) Lambropoulos, Victoria
Journal name Alternative law journal
Volume number 34
Issue number 3
Start page 189
End page 192
Total pages 4
Publisher Legal Service Bulletin Co-operative
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1037-969X
Summary Workers have in the past have been seen as a hindrance to environmental reform. This has been primarily because of the fear of job loss. The job versus the environment dichotomy that has placed workers and trade unions against environmentalists is unhelpful and believed by many as outdated. Internationally, trade unions have worked together with the United Nations and other international bodies to ensure that the rights of workers have not been ignored in the climate change debate. Significantly workers are now seen as part of the answer. Workers are not a hindrance to environmental reform. Rather they are an important part of finding solutions to climate change and wider environmental sustainability measures in our community. The United Nations Environmental Programme report titled ‘Labour and the Environment; A Natural Synergy’ examines how workers and their representative trade unions can make a significant contribution towards promoting action on climate change and wider environmental sustainability measures in the workplace. The report outlines three broad recommendations which countries can implement to foster a growing ‘synergy’ between the interests of labour and protection of the environment. The advantage of the report is that it discusses the recommendations in the context of existing laws and general regulatory structures common to many countries including Australia. The first two recommendations draw upon labour laws whilst the third is in the area of company law. The first recommendation is the use of enterprise bargaining to incorporate clauses which protect and promote the environment in enterprise agreements commonly called ‘green friendly’ clauses. The second recommendation is the use of occupational health and safety laws as a vehicle for the promotion of environmental standards in the workplace. The third recommendation is the active engagement of corporate social responsibility principles by companies. This article discusses the recommendations in the context of Australian law.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 180118 Labour Law
150306 Industrial Relations
150303 Corporate Governance and Stakeholder Engagement
Socio Economic Objective 940599 Work and Institutional Development not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Legal Service Bulletin Cooperative
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021075

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.