You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Talking it up! Project report : Aboriginal voices in the formulation of health policy that works : full report

Firebrace, Shirley, Blow, Reg, Pollock, Sarah, Taket, Ann and Barter-Godfrey, Sarah 2009, Talking it up! Project report : Aboriginal voices in the formulation of health policy that works : full report, Wesley Mission Melbourne, Melbourne.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
taket-talkingitupfullreport-2009.pdf Published version application/pdf 5.29MB 330

Title Talking it up! Project report : Aboriginal voices in the formulation of health policy that works : full report
Author(s) Firebrace, Shirley
Blow, Reg
Pollock, Sarah
Taket, AnnORCID iD for Taket, Ann orcid.org/0000-0002-0971-5884
Barter-Godfrey, Sarah
Publication date 2009
Total pages 325 p.
Publisher Wesley Mission Melbourne
Place of Publication Melbourne
Keyword(s) Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander health
community participation in health policy
Summary Initially, there were three separate strands to the work of the project: a series of forums involving group interviews/discussions with community members; a policy analysis that reviewed policies relating to Aboriginal health at federal and state level; and a literature review. The results of these three separate strands of analysis were then brought together in a fourth strand to the work, a process involving community members to discuss and agree the overall recommendations contained in this report.

Through this structure, the project employed a participatory methodology as the basis for individual and collective empowerment in relation to health outcomes. As mentioned above, the need for the project was identified by Aboriginal people, through their own processes of healing. The need was presented by appropriate figures within their communities, namely community elders. They invited other Aboriginal people to take part through their own communication channels, thus ensuring that responsibility for engagement in the project, and in formulating action for improvement, remained with Aboriginal people and their families. However, the project design also recognised that Aboriginal people exist within broader structural and policy constraints which impact on their ability to manage their own lives successfully or otherwise. Thus the project sought to combine indigenous and non-indigenous knowledge through bringing together the three strands of work in the way described.

A Community Reference Group guided the work of the project at all stages, endorsed the findings and drafted the recommendations. The two elders who had identified the need for the project formed the core of the group, and worked on the project from start to finish. At different times during the project, other community members joined the group to assist in its work, including training Aboriginal researchers, letting others know about the forums, discussing findings and drafting recommendations.
Initially, there were three separate strands to the work of the project: a series of forums involving group interviews/discussions with community members; a policy analysis that reviewed policies relating to Aboriginal health at federal and state level; and a literature review. The results of these three separate strands of analysis were then brought together in a fourth strand to the work, a process involving community members to discuss and agree the overall recommendations contained in this report.

Through this structure, the project employed a participatory methodology as the basis for individual and collective empowerment in relation to health outcomes. As mentioned above, the need for the project was identified by Aboriginal people, through their own processes of healing. The need was presented by appropriate figures within their communities, namely community elders. They invited other Aboriginal people to take part through their own communication channels, thus ensuring that responsibility for engagement in the project, and in formulating action for improvement, remained with Aboriginal people and their families. However, the project design also recognised that Aboriginal people exist within broader structural and policy constraints which impact on their ability to manage their own lives successfully or otherwise. Thus the project sought to combine indigenous and non-indigenous knowledge through bringing together the three strands of work in the way described.


Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9781875146321
Language eng
Field of Research 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
160508 Health Policy
Socio Economic Objective 920301 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health - Determinants of Health
HERDC Research category A4 Major research monograph
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Wesley Mission Melbourne
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021085

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 1040 Abstract Views, 330 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 19 Nov 2009, 16:22:16 EST by Ann Taket

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.