Towards a set of priorities for bird conservation and research in Australia : the perceptions of ornithologists

Miller, Kelly K. and Weston, Michael A. 2009, Towards a set of priorities for bird conservation and research in Australia : the perceptions of ornithologists, Emu, vol. 109, no. 1, pp. 67-74, doi: 10.1071/MU08054.

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Title Towards a set of priorities for bird conservation and research in Australia : the perceptions of ornithologists
Author(s) Miller, Kelly K.ORCID iD for Miller, Kelly K. orcid.org/0000-0003-4360-6232
Weston, Michael A.ORCID iD for Weston, Michael A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8717-0410
Journal name Emu
Volume number 109
Issue number 1
Start page 67
End page 74
Total pages 8
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic.
Publication date 2009-03
ISSN 0158-4197
1448-5540
Summary Australian delegates at the Australasian Ornithological Conference (2007) were surveyed by questionnaire to determine their perceived research and conservation priorities for Australian birds (n = 134). Respondents were honours or postgraduate students (37.4%), academics (26.2%), wildlife managers (6.5%), land managers (6.5%), environmental consultants (5.6%), independent wildlife researchers (5.6%) or had ‘other’ occupations not relevant to birds or their management (12.1%). Respondents rated their priorities on a predetermined set of issues, and were invited to add additional priorities. ‘Conservation of threatened species’ was considered the highest priority, followed by ‘Conservation of birds and biodiversity in general’, ‘Monitoring’, ‘Management’ and ‘Working with communities’. ‘Animal welfare/rights’ was regarded as comparatively less important. Eight of 11 conservation strategies were regarded as of high importance, these included habitat protection and rehabilitation, threat abatement, research, advocacy and education. This study documents the view of the ornithological community with respect to priority issues facing birds and could potentially feed into government and other policies aimed at conserving and understanding Australia’s birds.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/MU08054
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
Socio Economic Objective 969999 Environment not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Royal Australasian Orinthologists Union
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021089

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