Influence of heat on biological activity and concentration of oleocanthal : a natural anti-inflammatory agent in virgin olive oil

Cicerale, Sarah, Conlan, Xavier, Barnett, Neil W, Sinclair, Andrew and Keast, Russell 2009, Influence of heat on biological activity and concentration of oleocanthal : a natural anti-inflammatory agent in virgin olive oil, Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, vol. 57, no. 4, pp. 1326-1330.

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Title Influence of heat on biological activity and concentration of oleocanthal : a natural anti-inflammatory agent in virgin olive oil
Author(s) Cicerale, Sarah
Conlan, Xavier
Barnett, Neil W
Sinclair, Andrew
Keast, Russell
Journal name Journal of agricultural and food chemistry
Volume number 57
Issue number 4
Start page 1326
End page 1330
Total pages 5
Publisher American Chemical Society
Place of publication Columbus, Oh.
Publication date 2009-02
ISSN 0021-8561
1520-5118
Keyword(s) Olive oil
HPLC
sensory
Mediterranean diet
health benefits
Summary The olive oil phenolic oleocanthal is a natural nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory compound that irritates the oral pharynx in a dose-dependent manner. It has been proposed that the biological activity of oleocanthal is partially responsible for the beneficial health effects of the Mediterranean diet. Virgin
olive oil containing oleocanthal is often added as an ingredient in a number of cooked dishes, and therefore it is of great importance to understand how best to preserve the putative health-promoting benefits of this compound, as olive oil phenolics are subject to degradation upon heating in general. One extra virgin olive oil containing 53.9 mg/kg oleocanthal was heated at various temperatures (100, 170, and 240 °C) for set time periods (0, 1, 5, 20, 60, and 90 min). Oleocanthal concentrations were quantified using HPLC, and its biological activity was determined with a taste bioassay measuring the intensity of throat irritation. Results demonstrated that oleocanthal was heat stable compared with other olive oil phenolics, with a maximum loss of 16% as determined by HPLC analysis. However, there was a significant decrease of up to 31% (p < 0.05) in the biological activity of oleocanthal as determined by the taste bioassay. Although there was minimal degradation of leocanthal concentration, there was a significant decrease in the biological activity of oleocanthal upon extended heating time, indicating a possible loss of the putative health -benefiting properties of oleocanthal. Alternatively, the difference in the concentration and biological activity of oleocanthal after heat treatment could be a result of an oleocanthal antagonist forming, decreasing or masking the biological activity of oleocanthal.
Language eng
Field of Research 030401 Biologically Active Molecules
Socio Economic Objective 970103 Expanding Knowledge in the Chemical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, American Chemical Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021099

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