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What is wrong with a big house?

Fuller, R. J., Crawford, R. H. and Leonard, D. 2009, What is wrong with a big house?, in ANZAScA 2009 : Performative ecologies in the built environment | Sustainable research across disciplines : Proceedings of the 43rd Annual Conference of the Architectural Science Association, University of Tasmania, ANZAScA, Launceston, Tasmania, pp. 1-10.

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Title What is wrong with a big house?
Author(s) Fuller, R. J.
Crawford, R. H.
Leonard, D.
Conference name Conference of A.N.Z.A.Sc.A. (43rd : 2009 : Launceston, Tasmania)
Conference location Launceston, Tasmania
Conference dates 25-27 November 2009
Title of proceedings ANZAScA 2009 : Performative ecologies in the built environment | Sustainable research across disciplines : Proceedings of the 43rd Annual Conference of the Architectural Science Association, University of Tasmania
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2009
Conference series Australia and New Zealand Architectural Science Association Conference
Start page 1
End page 10
Publisher ANZAScA
Place of publication Launceston, Tasmania
Keyword(s) building materials
embodied energy
operational energy
greenhouse gases
Summary ln Australia in the 1950s, the average house size was approximately 100 mz. By 2008, the average size of a new house had risen to approximately 238 mz i.e. an increase of nearly 140%. Over the same period, occupancy levels have fallen by nearly one third from 3.7 to 2.5 persons per household. The aim of this paper is to contrast the total and per capita resource demand (direct and embodied energy, water and materials) for two houses typical of their respective era and draw some conclusions from the results. Using the software Autodesk Revit Architecture and drawings for typical 1950 and 2009 houses, the material quantities for these dwellings have been determined. Using known coefficients, the embodied energy and water in the materials have been calculated. Operating energy requirements have been calculated using NatHERS estimates. Water requirements have been calculated using historical and current water data. The greenhouse gas emissions associated with the resource use have also been calculated using established coefficients. Results are compared on a per capita basis. The research found that although the energy to operate the modern house and annual water use had fallen, the embodied energy and associated greenhouse gas emissions from material use had risen significantly. This was driven by the size of the house and the change in construction practices.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9781862955479
Language eng
Field of Research 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 850799 Energy Conservation and Efficiency not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2009, ANZAScA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021257

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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