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The cost-effectiveness of removing television advertising of high-fat and/or high-sugar food and beverages to Australian children

Magnus, A., Haby, M. M., Carter, R. and Swinburn, B. 2009, The cost-effectiveness of removing television advertising of high-fat and/or high-sugar food and beverages to Australian children, International journal of obesity, vol. 33, no. 10, pp. 1094-1102, doi: 10.1038/ijo.2009.156.

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Title The cost-effectiveness of removing television advertising of high-fat and/or high-sugar food and beverages to Australian children
Author(s) Magnus, A.ORCID iD for Magnus, A. orcid.org/0000-0002-1165-8161
Haby, M. M.
Carter, R.ORCID iD for Carter, R. orcid.org/0000-0002-1586-5619
Swinburn, B.
Journal name International journal of obesity
Volume number 33
Issue number 10
Start page 1094
End page 1102
Total pages 9
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication Hampshire, England
Publication date 2009-10
ISSN 0307-0565
1476-5497
Keyword(s) children
advertising
modelling health benefit
cost-effectiveness
Summary Objective: To model the health benefits and cost-effectiveness of banning television (TV) advertisements in Australia for energy-dense, nutrient-poor food and beverages during children's peak viewing times.

Methods: Benefits were modelled as changes in body mass index (BMI) and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) saved. Intervention costs (AUD$) were compared with future health-care cost offsets from reduced prevalence of obesity-related health conditions. Changes in BMI were assumed to be maintained through to adulthood. The comparator was current practice, the reference year was 2001, and the discount rate for costs and benefits was 3%. The impact of the withdrawal of non-core food and beverage advertisements on children's actual food consumption was drawn from the best available evidence (a randomized controlled trial of advertisement exposure and food consumption). Supporting evidence was found in ecological relationships between TV advertising and childhood obesity, and from the effects of marketing bans on other products. A Working Group of stakeholders provided input into decisions surrounding the modelling assumptions and second-stage filters of 'strength of evidence', 'equity', 'acceptability to stakeholders', 'feasibility of implementation', 'sustainability' and 'side-effects'.

Results: The intervention had a gross incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of AUD$ 3.70 (95% uncertainty interval (UI) $2.40, $7.70) per DALY. Total DALYs saved were 37 000 (95% UI 16 000, 59 000). When the present value of potential savings in future health-care costs was considered (AUD$ 300m (95% UI $130m, $480m), the intervention was 'dominant', because it resulted in both a health gain and a cost offset compared with current practice.

Conclusions:
Although recognizing the limitations of the available evidence, restricting TV food advertising to children would be one of the most cost-effective population-based interventions available to governments today. Despite its economic credentials from a public health perspective, the initiative is strongly opposed by food and advertising industries and is under review by the current Australian government.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2009.156
Field of Research 140208 Health Economics
Socio Economic Objective 920208 Health Policy Evaluation
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Macmillan Publishers Limited
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021320

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.