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Responses to flooding and drying in seedlings of a common Australian desert floodplain shrub : Muehlenbeckia florulenta Meisn. (tangled lignum)

Capon, S. J., James, C. S., Williams, L. and Quinn, G. P. 2009, Responses to flooding and drying in seedlings of a common Australian desert floodplain shrub : Muehlenbeckia florulenta Meisn. (tangled lignum), Environmental and experimental botany, vol. 66, no. 2, pp. 178-185, doi: 10.1016/j.envexpbot.2009.02.012.

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Title Responses to flooding and drying in seedlings of a common Australian desert floodplain shrub : Muehlenbeckia florulenta Meisn. (tangled lignum)
Formatted title Responses to flooding and drying in seedlings of a common Australian desert floodplain shrub : Muehlenbeckia florulenta Meisn. (tangled lignum)
Author(s) Capon, S. J.
James, C. S.
Williams, L.
Quinn, G. P.
Journal name Environmental and experimental botany
Volume number 66
Issue number 2
Start page 178
End page 185
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier B. V.
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2009-05
ISSN 0098-8472
1873-7307
Keyword(s) adaption
drought
ontogeny
plasticity
seedling establishnent
stress tolerance
unpredictable flooding
Summary We investigated the effects of flooding and drying over 6 months on growth and biomass allocation in seedlings of Muehlenbeckia florulenta Meisn. (tangled lignum), a common and widely distributed shrub of Australia's desert floodplains. We sought to determine if lignum seedlings respond to flooding or drying by altering traits or allocation patterns or instead display fixed patterns of development. Since desert floodplains are highly unpredictable and heterogeneous environments, we hypothesised that adaptive phenotypic plasticity is unlikely to have developed or be advantageous in seedlings of this species as environmental state changes are highly variable in their timing and duration and plants risk being caught out of kilter with environmental conditions. To test this, we conducted a glasshouse experiment in which lignum seedlings, grown in both clay and sandy sediments, were subjected to a range of hydrological conditions over a period of 6 months. Lignum seedlings exhibited considerable tolerance of both flooding and drying in our experiment and no mortality was observed. Growth was significantly reduced by flooding, however, and seedlings displayed extremely delayed development rather than plasticity in overall biomass allocation or any of the specific morphological variables we measured. Lignum seedlings were considerably more tolerant of drying than flooding and responded plastically by reducing leaf area ratios through reductions in specific leaf areas and leaf production and expansion. Sediment type had little effect on seedling development. Our results indicate that surface water hydrology is likely to be a major determinant of recruitment patterns in this ecologically significant species.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.envexpbot.2009.02.012
Field of Research 060208 Terrestrial Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 960910 Sparseland, Permanent Grassland and Arid Zone Land and Water Management
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Elsevier B.V.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021347

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Created: Mon, 14 Dec 2009, 10:27:33 EST by Teresa Treffry

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