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MtDNA diversity of the critically endangered Mekong giant catfish (Pangasianodon gigas Chevey, 1913) and closely related species : implications for conservation

Na-Nakorn, U., Sukmanomon, S., Nakajima, M., Taniguchi, N., Kamonrat, W., Poompuang, S. and Nguyen, T.T.T. 2006, MtDNA diversity of the critically endangered Mekong giant catfish (Pangasianodon gigas Chevey, 1913) and closely related species : implications for conservation, Animal conservation, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 483-494, doi: 10.1111/j.1469-1795.2006.00064.x.

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Title MtDNA diversity of the critically endangered Mekong giant catfish (Pangasianodon gigas Chevey, 1913) and closely related species : implications for conservation
Formatted title MtDNA diversity of the critically endangered Mekong giant catfish (Pangasianodon gigas Chevey, 1913) and closely related species : implications for conservation
Author(s) Na-Nakorn, U.
Sukmanomon, S.
Nakajima, M.
Taniguchi, N.
Kamonrat, W.
Poompuang, S.
Nguyen, T.T.T.
Journal name Animal conservation
Volume number 9
Issue number 4
Start page 483
End page 494
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2006-11
ISSN 1469-1795
1367-9430
Keyword(s) genetic diversity
mtDNA
critically endangered
conservation
pangasiids
Pangasianodon gigas
Summary Catfishes of the family Pangasiidae are an important group that contributes significantly to the fisheries of the Mekong River basin. In recent times the populations of several catfish species have declined, thought to be due to overfishing and habitat changes brought about by anthropogenic influences. The Mekong giant catfish Pangasianodon gigas Chevey, 1913 is listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. In the present study, we assessed the level of genetic diversity of nine catfish species using sequences of the large subunit of mitochondrial DNA (16S rRNA). Approximately 570 base pairs (bp) were sequenced from 672 individuals of nine species. In all species studied, haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity ranged from 0.118±0.101 to 0.667±0.141 and from 0.0002±0.0003 to 0.0016±0.0013, respectively. Four haplotypes were detected among 16 samples from natural populations of the critically endangered Mekong giant catfish. The results, in spite of the limited sample size for some species investigated, indicated that the level of genetic variation observed in wild populations of the Mekong giant catfish (haplotype diversity=0.350±0.148, nucleotide diversity=0.0009±0.0008) is commensurate with that of some other related species. This finding indicates that (1) wild populations of the Mekong giant catfish might be more robust than currently thought or (2) present wild populations of this species carry a genetic signature of the historically larger population(s). Findings from this study also have important implications for conservation of the Mekong giant catfish, especially in designing and implementing artificial breeding programme for restocking purposes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-1795.2006.00064.x
Field of Research 070401 Aquaculture
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, The Zoological Society of London
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021363

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Created: Mon, 14 Dec 2009, 20:24:56 EST by Thuy Nguyen

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