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Surviving urbanisation : maintaining bird species diversity in urban Melbourne

White, John G., Fitzsimons, James A., Palmer, Grant C. and Antos, Mark J. 2009, Surviving urbanisation : maintaining bird species diversity in urban Melbourne, Victorian naturalist, vol. 126, no. 3, pp. 73-78.

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Title Surviving urbanisation : maintaining bird species diversity in urban Melbourne
Author(s) White, John G.ORCID iD for White, John G. orcid.org/0000-0002-7375-5944
Fitzsimons, James A.ORCID iD for Fitzsimons, James A. orcid.org/0000-0003-4277-8040
Palmer, Grant C.
Antos, Mark J.
Journal name Victorian naturalist
Volume number 126
Issue number 3
Start page 73
End page 78
Total pages 6
Publisher The Field Naturalists Club of Victoria
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2009
ISSN 0042-5184
Keyword(s) urbanisation
bird assemblages
remnant vegatation
streetscapes
riparian zones
Summary The relationships between vegetation and bird communities within an urban landscape are synthetised, based on a series of studies we conducted. Our studies indicate that streetscape vegetation plays an important role in
influencing urban bird communities, with streetscapes dominated by native plants supporting communities with high native species richness and abundance, while exotic and newly-developed streetscapes support more introduced bird species and fewer native bird species. Native streetscapes can also provide important resources for certain groups of birds, such as nectarivores. Our research has also revealed that urban remnants are likely to support more native bird species if they are larger and if they contain components of riparian vegetation. Vegetation structure and quality does not appear to be as important a driver as remnant size in determining the richness of native bird communities. Introduced birds were shown to occur in remnants at low densities, irrespective of remnant size, when compared to densities found in streetscapes dominated by exotic vegetation. We discuss our results in terms of practical planning and management options to increase and maintain urban avian diversity and conclude by offering suggestions for future fields of research in terms of urban bird communities.
Language eng
Field of Research 060208 Terrestrial Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 961310 Remnant Vegetation and Protected Conservation Areas in Urban and Industrial Environments
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021497

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