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Minimising colonic fermentation of high fructan foods : using food processing techniques to reduce levels of fructans in onion and garlic

Ferris, S.M., Muir, J.G., Rosella, O., Rose, R., Gibson, P.R. and Smith, S. 2008, Minimising colonic fermentation of high fructan foods : using food processing techniques to reduce levels of fructans in onion and garlic, in NSA 2008 : 32nd Nutrition Society of Australia Annual Scientific Meeting, Nutrition Society of Australia, Kent Town, S. Aust..

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Title Minimising colonic fermentation of high fructan foods : using food processing techniques to reduce levels of fructans in onion and garlic
Author(s) Ferris, S.M.
Muir, J.G.
Rosella, O.
Rose, R.
Gibson, P.R.
Smith, S.
Conference name Nutrition Society of Australia. Scientific Meeting (32nd : 2008 : Glenelg, S. Aust.)
Conference location Glenelg, S. Aust.
Conference dates 30 November - 3 December 2008
Title of proceedings NSA 2008 : 32nd Nutrition Society of Australia Annual Scientific Meeting
Publication date 2008
Publisher Nutrition Society of Australia
Place of publication Kent Town, S. Aust.
Summary Background: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional disorder of the bowel, affecting up to 15% of Australian adults. Dietary triggers need to be identified and controlled. Researchers have shown that short chain carbohydrates, fructans (high in onion and garlic) play a major role in triggering IBS symptoms. Current dietary management aims to limit the intake of fructans in the diet. Another approach may be to use simple food processing to reduce fructans in foods.

Objective
: To investigate if pickling will reduce fructan levels in garlic and shallots, and if pickled garlic and shallots reduce colonic fermentation, and  abdominal symptoms in human volunteers.

Design: Fructan levels of the garlic and shallots were measured using the Megazyme fructan assay. 18 volunteers (13 healthy and 5 IBS) participated in a single blinded, randomised cross over study. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive a breakfast (potato and salmon patty) that was either high (unprocessed) or low (processed/pickled) in garlic and shallots. Breath hydrogen was measured every hour over a ten hour period, and abdominal symptoms were assessed using validated questionnaires.

Outcomes: Pickling over a 12 day period significantly reduced fructan levels in both garlic (p=.0.00) and shallots (p=0.00). Consumption of the low fructan breakfast resulted in significantly lower breath hydrogen (p=0.05), abdominal pain (p=0.032), and wind (p=0.04).

Conclusion: Pickling results in significantly lowered fructan levels in problem foods- shallots and garlic, and lowered colonic fermentation and abdominal symptoms in both healthy and IBS volunteers. This study provides another dietary strategy for dietetic counselling of patients with IBS.
Notes Abstract found in Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition : Vol. 17(Suppl 3) S54 (http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/ProcNutSoc/2000+/2008/2008.htm)
ISSN 0314-1004
Language eng
Field of Research 110199 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolomics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category E3.1 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2008, Nutrition Society of Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021578

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.