The effects of repetitive loading on bone mass and geometry in young male tennis players : a quantative study using magnetic resonance imaging

Ducher, Gaele, Daly, Robin M and Bass, Shona L 2009, The effects of repetitive loading on bone mass and geometry in young male tennis players : a quantative study using magnetic resonance imaging, Journal of bone and mineral research, vol. 24, no. 10, pp. 1686-1692.

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Title The effects of repetitive loading on bone mass and geometry in young male tennis players : a quantative study using magnetic resonance imaging
Author(s) Ducher, Gaele
Daly, Robin M
Bass, Shona L
Journal name Journal of bone and mineral research
Volume number 24
Issue number 10
Start page 1686
End page 1692
Total pages 7
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2009
ISSN 0884-0431
1523-4681
Keyword(s) exercise
children
cortical bone
growth and development
mechanical loading
Summary Pre- and early puberty seem to be the most opportune times for exercise to  improve bone strength in girls, but few studies have addressed this issue in boys. This study investigated the site-, surface-, and maturity-specific exercise-induced changes in bone mass and geometry in young boys. The osteogenic effects of loading were analyzed by comparing the playing and nonplaying humeri of 43 male pre-, peri-, and postpubertal competitive tennis players 10-19 yr of age. Total bone area, medullary area, and cortical area were determined at the mid (40-50%) and distal humerus (60-70%) of both arms using MRI. Humeral bone mass (BMC) was derived from a whole body DXA scan. In prepubertal boys, BMC was 17% greater in the playing compared with nonplaying arm (p < 0.001), which was accompanied by a 12-21% greater cortical area, because of greater periosteal expansion than medullary expansion at the midhumerus and periosteal expansion associated with medullary contraction at the distal humerus. Compared with prepuberty, the side-to-side differences in BMC (27%) and cortical area (20-33%) were greater in peripuberty (p < 0.01). No differences were found between peri- and postpuberty despite longer playing history in the postpubertal players.The osteogenic response to loading was greater in peri- compared with prepubertal boys, which is in contrast with our previous findings in girls and may be caused by differences in training history. This suggests that the window of opportunity to improve bone mass and size through exercise may be longer in boys than in girls.
Language eng
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920116 Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021595

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