Effect of the glycemic index of carbohydrates on day-long (10 h) profiles of plasma glucose, insulin, cholecystokinin and ghrelin

Reynolds, RC, Stockmann, KS, Atkinson, FS, Denyer, GS and Brand-Miller, JC 2009, Effect of the glycemic index of carbohydrates on day-long (10 h) profiles of plasma glucose, insulin, cholecystokinin and ghrelin, European journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 63, pp. 872-878.

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Title Effect of the glycemic index of carbohydrates on day-long (10 h) profiles of plasma glucose, insulin, cholecystokinin and ghrelin
Author(s) Reynolds, RC
Stockmann, KS
Atkinson, FS
Denyer, GS
Brand-Miller, JC
Journal name European journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 63
Start page 872
End page 878
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication Basingstoke, England
Publication date 2009
ISSN 0954-3007
1476-5640
Keyword(s) carbohydrate
glycemic index
gut peptide
cholecystokinin
ghrelin
satiety
Summary Background: Low glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates have been linked to increased satiety. The drive to eat may be mediated by postprandial changes in glucose, insulin and gut peptides.
Objective
: To investigate the effect of a low and a high GI diet on day-long (10 h) blood concentrations of glucose, insulin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and ghrelin (GHR).
Design: Subjects (n¼12) consumed a high and a low GI diet in a randomized, crossover design, consisting of four meals that were matched for macronutrients and fibre, and differed only in carbohydrate quality (GI). Blood was sampled every 30–60 min and assayed for glucose, insulin, CCK and GHR.
Results: The high GI diet resulted in significantly higher glucose and insulin mean incremental areas under the curve (IAUC, P¼0.027 and P¼0.001 respectively). CCK concentration was 59% higher during the first 7 h of the low GI diet (394±95 pmol/l min) vs the high GI diet (163±38 pmol/l min, P¼0.046), but there was no difference over 10 h (P¼0.224). GHR concentration was inversely correlated with insulin concentration (Pearson correlation 0.48, P¼0.007), but did not differ significantly between the low and high GI diets.
Conclusions: Mixed meals of lower GI are associated with lower day-long concentrations of glucose and insulin, and higher CCK after breakfast, morning tea and lunch. This metabolic profile could mediate differences in satiety and hunger seen in some, but not all, studies.
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Macmillan Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021774

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Public Health Research, Evaluation, and Policy Cluster
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