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Investigating women's preference for sildenafil or tadalafil use by their partners with erectile dysfunction : the partners' preference study.

Conaglen, Helen M. and Conaglen, John V. 2008, Investigating women's preference for sildenafil or tadalafil use by their partners with erectile dysfunction : the partners' preference study., Journal of sexual medicine, vol. 5, no. 5, pp. 1198-1207, doi: 10.1111/j.1743-6109.2008.00774.x.

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Title Investigating women's preference for sildenafil or tadalafil use by their partners with erectile dysfunction : the partners' preference study.
Author(s) Conaglen, Helen M.
Conaglen, John V.
Journal name Journal of sexual medicine
Volume number 5
Issue number 5
Start page 1198
End page 1207
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2008-05
ISSN 1743-6095
1743-6109
Keyword(s) female partners
erectile dysfunction
treatment preference
couples
tadalafil
sildenafil
Summary Introduction: Several preference studies comparing a short-acting with a longer-acting phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor have been conducted in men. Most men in those studies preferred tadalafil rather than sildenafil, and recent post hoc analysis of one study described several factors associated with men’s treatment preference. No prospective studies have investigated the woman partners’ preferences.

Aim: To investigate the treatment preference of women who were partners of men using oral medications for erectile dysfunction (ED) in a single-center open-label crossover study.

Methods: One hundred heterosexual couples in stable relationships, with male partners having ED based on the erectile function subscale of the International Index of Erectile Function, were randomly assigned to receive sildenafil or  tadalafil for a 12-week phase, followed by another 12-week period using the alternate drug. Male and female participants completed sexual event diaries during both study phases, and the female participants were interviewed at  baseline, midpoint, and end of study.

Main Outcome Measures
: Primary outcome data were the women’s final  interviews during which they were asked which drug they preferred and their reasons for that preference.

Results: A total of 79.2% of the women preferred their partners’ use of tadalafil, while 15.6% preferred sildenafil. Preference was not affected by age or treatment order randomization. Women preferring tadalafil reported feeling more relaxed, experiencing less pressure, and enjoying a more natural or spontaneous sexual experience as reasons for their choice. Mean number of tablets used, events recorded, events per week, and days between events were not significantly different during each study phase.

Conclusion: Women’s preferences were similar to men when using these two drugs. While the women’s reasons for preferring tadalafil emphasized relaxed, satisfying, longer-lasting sexual experiences, those preferring sildenafil focused on satisfaction and drug effectiveness for their partner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-6109.2008.00774.x
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, International Society for Sexual Medicine
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021910

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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