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Exploring the relationship between media coverage and participation in entrepreneurship : initial global evidence and research implications

Hindle, Kevin and Klyver, Kim 2007, Exploring the relationship between media coverage and participation in entrepreneurship : initial global evidence and research implications, International entrepreneurship and management journal, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 217-242.

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Title Exploring the relationship between media coverage and participation in entrepreneurship : initial global evidence and research implications
Author(s) Hindle, Kevin
Klyver, Kim
Journal name International entrepreneurship and management journal
Volume number 3
Issue number 2
Start page 217
End page 242
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2007-06
ISSN 1554-7191
1555-1938
Keyword(s) mass media
reinforcement theory
entrepreneurship
Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM)
Summary Using a set of variables measured in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) study, our empirical investigation explored the influence of mass media through national culture on national entrepreneurial participation rates in 37 countries over 4 years (2000 to 2003). We found that stories about successful entrepreneurs, conveyed in mass media, were not significantly associated with the rate of nascent (opportunity searching) or the rate of actual (business activities commenced up to 3 months old) start-up activity, but that there was a significant positive association between the volume of entrepreneurship media stories and a nation’s volume of people running a young business (that is in GEM terminology, a business aged greater than 3 but less than 42 months old). More particularly, such stories had strong positive association with opportunity oriented operators of young businesses. Together, these findings are compatible with what in the mass communications theory literature may be called the ‘reinforcement model’. This argues that mass media are only capable of reinforcing their audience’s existing values and choice propensities but are not capable of shaping or changing those values and choices. In the area covered by this paper, policy-makers are committing public resources to media campaigns of doubtful utility in the absence of an evidence base. A main implication drawn from this study is the need for further and more sophisticated investigation into the relationship between media coverage of entrepreneurship, national culture and the rates and nature of people’s participation in the various stages of the entrepreneurial process.
Notes The original publication is available at springerlink.com
Language eng
Field of Research 140299 Applied Economics not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Springer Science + Business Media, LLC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021962

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
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