A tangled tale of two teal : population history of the grey Anas gracilis and chestnut teal A. castanea of Australia

Joseph, Leo, Adcock, Gregory J., Linde, Celeste, Omland, Kevin E., Heinsohn, Robert, Chesser, R. Terry and Roshier, David 2009, A tangled tale of two teal : population history of the grey Anas gracilis and chestnut teal A. castanea of Australia, Journal of avian biology, vol. 40, no. 4, pp. 430-439.

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Title A tangled tale of two teal : population history of the grey Anas gracilis and chestnut teal A. castanea of Australia
Formatted title A tangled tale of two teal : population history of the grey Anas gracilis and chestnut teal A. castanea of Australia
Author(s) Joseph, Leo
Adcock, Gregory J.
Linde, Celeste
Omland, Kevin E.
Heinsohn, Robert
Chesser, R. Terry
Roshier, David
Journal name Journal of avian biology
Volume number 40
Issue number 4
Start page 430
End page 439
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Munksgaard
Place of publication Copenhagen, Denmark
Publication date 2009-07
ISSN 0908-8857
1600-048X
Summary Two Australian species of teal (Anseriformes: Anatidae: Anas), the grey teal Anas gracilis and the chestnut teal A. castanea, are remarkable for the zero or near-zero divergence recorded between them in earlier surveys of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity. We confirmed this result through wider geographical and population sampling as well as nucleotide sampling in the more rapidly evolving mtDNA control region. Any data set where two species share polymorphism as is the case here can be explained by a model of gene flow through hybridization on one hand or by incomplete lineage sorting on the other hand. Ideally, analysis of such shared polymorphism would simultaneously estimate the likelihood of both phenomena. To do this, we used the underlying principle of the IMa package to explore ramifications to understanding population histories of A. gracilis and A. castanea. We cannot reject that hybridization occurs between the two species but an equally or more plausible finding for their nearly zero divergence is incomplete sorting following very recent divergence between the two, probably in the mid-late Pleistocene. Our data add to studies that explore intermediate stages in the evolution of reciprocal monophyly and paraphyletic or polyphyletic relationships in mtDNA diversity among widespread Australian birds.
Language eng
Field of Research 050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 960899 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of Environments not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30021986

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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