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Heterotrimeric G protein γ subunits provide functional selectivity in Gβγ dimer signaling in arabidopsis

Trusov, Yuri, Rookes, James Edward, Tilbrook, Kimberly, Chakravorty, David, Mason, Michael Glenn, Anderson, David, Chen, Jin-Gui, Jones, Alan M. and Botella, Jose Ramon 2007, Heterotrimeric G protein γ subunits provide functional selectivity in Gβγ dimer signaling in arabidopsis, Plant cell, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 1235-1250.

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Title Heterotrimeric G protein γ subunits provide functional selectivity in Gβγ dimer signaling in arabidopsis
Alternative title Heterotrimeric G protein [gamma] subunits provide functional selectivity in G[beta][gamma] dimer signaling in arabidopsis(OA)
Author(s) Trusov, Yuri
Rookes, James Edward
Tilbrook, Kimberly
Chakravorty, David
Mason, Michael Glenn
Anderson, David
Chen, Jin-Gui
Jones, Alan M.
Botella, Jose Ramon
Journal name Plant cell
Volume number 19
Issue number 4
Start page 1235
End page 1250
Publisher American Society of Plant Biologists
Place of publication Rockville, Md.
Publication date 2007-04
ISSN 1040-4651
1532-298X
Summary The Arabidopsis thaliana heterotrimeric G protein complex is encoded by single canonical Galpha and Gbeta subunit genes and two Ggamma subunit genes (AGG1 and AGG2), raising the possibility that the two potential G protein complexes mediate different cellular processes. Mutants with reduced expression of one or both Ggamma genes revealed specialized roles for each Ggamma subunit. AGG1-deficient mutants, but not AGG2-deficient mutants, showed impaired resistance against necrotrophic pathogens, reduced induction of the plant defensin gene PDF1.2, and decreased sensitivity to methyl jasmonate. By contrast, both AGG1- and AGG2-deficient mutants were hypersensitive to auxin-mediated induction of lateral roots, suggesting that Gbetagamma1 and Gbetagamma2 synergistically inhibit auxin-dependent lateral root initiation. However, the involvement of each Ggamma subunit in this root response differs, with Gbetagamma1 acting within the central cylinder, attenuating acropetally transported auxin signaling, while Gbetagamma2 affects the action of basipetal auxin and graviresponsiveness within the epidermis and/or cortex. This selectivity also operates in the hypocotyl. Selectivity in Gbetagamma signaling was also found in other known AGB1-mediated pathways. agg1 mutants were hypersensitive to glucose and the osmotic agent mannitol during seed germination, while agg2 mutants were only affected by glucose. We show that both Ggamma subunits form functional Gbetagamma dimers and that each provides functional selectivity to the plant heterotrimeric G proteins, revealing a mechanism underlying the complexity of G protein-mediated signaling in plants.
Language eng
Field of Research 060702 Plant Cell and Molecular Biology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, American Society of Plant Biologists
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022127

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.