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Office building characteristics and the links with carbon emissions

Wilkinson, Sara J. and Reed, Richard G. 2006, Office building characteristics and the links with carbon emissions, Structural survey, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 240-251.

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Title Office building characteristics and the links with carbon emissions
Author(s) Wilkinson, Sara J.
Reed, Richard G.
Journal name Structural survey
Volume number 24
Issue number 3
Start page 240
End page 251
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2006
ISSN 0263-080X
1758-6844
Keyword(s) Australia
building specifications
energy consumption
energy management
office buildings
Summary Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present research which analysed energy consumption in the Melbourne central business district (CBD) office stock and examined all buildings to identify CO2 emissions in 2005. The rationale was that, by profiling a large group of buildings, it would be possible to identify characteristics of the stock. For example, do older buildings typically emit more CO2 per square metre than newer buildings?
Design/methodology/approach – This research conducted a detailed analysis of all Melbourne CBD office stock to identify which patterns and trends emerged regarding building characteristics and carbon emissions. The study examined variables such as building size, number of employees, occupancy levels, physical characteristics and building age.
Findings – By examining all office stock and aggregating data, the results confirm that it is possible to identify general physical building characteristics and carbon emissions. This research confirmed that clear relationships existed within the Melbourne CBD office stock in terms of building size, age and the density of occupation in relation to CO2 emissions.
Originality/value – Practitioners can apply this knowledge to the professional advice they give to clients to assist in achieving increased energy efficiency in the office stock, for example in refurbishment being conscious that smaller buildings will be generally less energy-efficient than larger ones.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 120104 Architectural Science and Technology (incl Acoustics, Lighting, Structure and Ecologically Sustainable Design)
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Emerald Group Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022146

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.