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Supporting self-management of chronic health conditions : Common approaches

Lawn, Sharon and Schoo, Adrian 2010, Supporting self-management of chronic health conditions : Common approaches, Patient education and counseling, vol. 80, no. 2, pp. 205-211, doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2009.10.006.

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Title Supporting self-management of chronic health conditions : Common approaches
Author(s) Lawn, Sharon
Schoo, Adrian
Journal name Patient education and counseling
Volume number 80
Issue number 2
Start page 205
End page 211
Publisher Elsevier Ireland Ltd
Place of publication Clare, Ireland
Publication date 2010-08
ISSN 0738-3991
1873-5134
Summary Objective : The aims of this paper are to provide a description of the principles of chronic condition self-management, common approaches to support currently used in Australian health services, and benefits and challenges associated with using these approaches.
Methods : We examined literature in this field in Australia and drew also from our own practice experience of implementing these approaches and providing education and training to primary health care professionals and organizations in the field.
Results : Using common examples of programs, advantages and disadvantages of peer-led groups (Stanford Courses), care planning (The Flinders Program), a brief primary care approach (the 5As), motivational interviewing and health coaching are explored.
Conclusions :
There are a number of common approaches used to enhance self-management. No one approach is superior to other approaches; in fact, they are often complimentary.
Practice implications :
The nature and context for patients’ contact with services, and patients’ specific needs and preferences are what must be considered when deciding on the most appropriate support mode to effectively engage patients and promote self-management. Choice of approach will also be determined by organizational factors and service structures. Whatever self-management support approaches used, of importance is how health services work together to provide support.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2009.10.006
Field of Research 111717 Primary Health Care
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022157

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Faculty of Health
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Created: Mon, 18 Jan 2010, 11:29:46 EST by Liz Jackway

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