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The influence of medical enduring power of attorney and advance directives on decision making by Australian intensive care doctors

Corke, Charlie, Milnes, Sharyn, Orford, Neil, Henry, Margaret J., Foss, Claire and Porter, Deborah 2009, The influence of medical enduring power of attorney and advance directives on decision making by Australian intensive care doctors, Critical care and resuscitation, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 122-128.

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Title The influence of medical enduring power of attorney and advance directives on decision making by Australian intensive care doctors
Author(s) Corke, Charlie
Milnes, Sharyn
Orford, Neil
Henry, Margaret J.
Foss, Claire
Porter, Deborah
Journal name Critical care and resuscitation
Volume number 11
Issue number 2
Start page 122
End page 128
Total pages 7
Publisher Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
Place of publication Bedford Park, S.A.
Publication date 2009-06
ISSN 1441-2772
Summary OBJECTIVE: Despite government encouragement for patients to make advance plans for medical treatment, and the increasing numbers of patients who have done this, there is little research that examines how doctors regard these plans.
DESIGN:
We surveyed Australian intensive care doctors, using a hypothetical clinical scenario, to evaluate how potential end-of-life treatment decisions might be influenced by advance planning - the appointment of a medical enduring power of attorney (MEPA) or an advance care plan (ACP). Using open-ended questions we sought to explore the reasoning behind the doctors' decisions.
RESULTS:
275 surveys were returned (18.3% response rate). We found that opinions expressed by an MEPA and ACP have some influence on treatment decisions, but that intensive care doctors had major reservations. Most did not follow the request for palliation made by the MEPA in the hypothetical scenario.
CONCLUSIONS: Many intensive care doctors believe end-of-life decisions remain medical decisions, and MEPAs and ACPs need only be respected when they accord with the doctor's treatment decision. This study suggests a need for further education of doctors, particularly those working in intensive care, who are responsible for initiating and maintaining life support treatment.
Language eng
Field of Research 180199 Law not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022158

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Business and Law
Law
School of Medicine
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Created: Mon, 18 Jan 2010, 11:49:31 EST by Gabrielle Lamb

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