You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

An evaluation of the viability of photovoltaics in residential schemes managed by UK registered social landlords

Jackson, Craig and Wilkinson, Sara J. 2003, An evaluation of the viability of photovoltaics in residential schemes managed by UK registered social landlords, in COBRA 2003 : Proceedings of the RICS Foundation Construction and Building Research Conference, RICS Foundation, London, England, pp. 396-410.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
wilkinson-evaluationoftheviability-2003.pdf Published version application/pdf 177.44KB 57

Title An evaluation of the viability of photovoltaics in residential schemes managed by UK registered social landlords
Author(s) Jackson, Craig
Wilkinson, Sara J.
Conference name Construction and Building Research Conference (2003 : Wolverhampton, England)
Conference location Wolverhampton, England
Conference dates 1-2 September, 2003
Title of proceedings COBRA 2003 : Proceedings of the RICS Foundation Construction and Building Research Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2003
Conference series RICS Foundation Construction and Building Research Conference
Start page 396
End page 410
Publisher RICS Foundation
Place of publication London, England
Summary Global demands on fossil fuels require the investigation of renewable and viable alternative energy supplies. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has concluded that current consumption of fossil fuels is untenable as atmospheric emissions of gases, in particular carbon dioxide (CO2), is having a significant and worsening effect on global climate change (IPCC 1992).

25% of UK CO2 emissions are generated in the housing sector (UKCCP 2000). As major providers of UK social housing, Registered Social Landlords (RSLs), indirectly make a significant contribution to UK CO2 emissions. In delivering UK Government policies, RSLs are required to meet national social and economic targets, as well as environmental targets. Clearly, social, environmental and economic issues combine in the arena of energy efficiency and social housing.

Potentially, the use of photovoltaics (PV) in social housing could assist the UK government in meeting targets in terms of affordable housing, providing "free" electricity to low income tenants, and with minimal environmental impact in urban areas. However, uptake of PV amongst RSLs in the UK has been minimal to date. This paper explores the factors that act as barriers to energy efficiency in this market.
Notes
Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in Deakin Research Online. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au

ISBN 1842191489
9781842191484
Language eng
Field of Research 120104 Architectural Science and Technology (incl Acoustics, Lighting, Structure and Ecologically Sustainable Design)
140219 Welfare Economics
Socio Economic Objective 970114 Expanding Knowledge in Economics
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2003, RICS Foundation
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022249

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 561 Abstract Views, 56 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 18 Jan 2010, 13:22:58 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.