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Office buildings and the environment : the increasing importance of ESD

Wilkinson, Sara J. and Reed, Richard G. 2006, Office buildings and the environment : the increasing importance of ESD, in PRRES 2006 : Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference of the Pacific Rim Real Estate Society, Pacific Rim Real Estate Society, [Auckland, New Zealand], pp. 1-13.

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Title Office buildings and the environment : the increasing importance of ESD
Author(s) Wilkinson, Sara J.
Reed, Richard G.
Conference name Pacific Rim Real Estate Society. Conference (12th : 2006 : Auckland, New Zealand)
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 22-25 January 2006
Title of proceedings PRRES 2006 : Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference of the Pacific Rim Real Estate Society
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2006
Conference series Pacific Rim Real Estate Society Conference
Start page 1
End page 13
Publisher Pacific Rim Real Estate Society
Place of publication [Auckland, New Zealand]
Summary The links between the built environment and sustainability issues such as fossil fuel consumption and climate change is clear. In developed countries buildings contribute around half of all carbon dioxide emissions and offer considerable scope for a significant contribution to sustainability through ecologically aware design and increased energy efficiency (BRE, 1996). The Australian commercial stock emits 12% of all greenhouse gas emissions however the commercial property market has some inherent barriers to sustainability (DSE, 2005). A substantial proportion of the stock is owned by institutional investors who are unconvinced by the need to improve their stock and pass on running costs to tenants (Callender & Key, 1997). As capital values are not greatly affected by sustainability, owners react by doing little or nothing and the effect is to limit sustainability related investment and undermine efforts to deliver sustainability in the sector.

Furthermore the efficiency of buildings declines over time and whilst energy efficiency is important to new design, the existing stock must be improved if urban built environment greenhouse gas emissions are to be reduced. Much of the property and surveying research has previously adopted an illustrative case study approach advocating the benefits of ESD and energy efficiency in existing buildings. This research adopts a radically different approach and profiles the entire office stock of a global CBD, namely Melbourne, which is seeking to become a carbon neutral city by 2020. The research also employs scenario forecasting to model future changes to the stock over a fifteen year period. This paper sets out the rationale for the research and establishes the methodological approach adopted by the research team.
Language eng
Field of Research 120104 Architectural Science and Technology (incl Acoustics, Lighting, Structure and Ecologically Sustainable Design)
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2006, PRRES
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022322

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
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