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Building a culture

Turrell, P. and Wilkinson, S. J. 2005, Building a culture, in Proceedings of the Queensland University of Technology Research Week International Conference, 4-5 July 2005, Brisbane, Queensland, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld..

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Title Building a culture
Author(s) Turrell, P.
Wilkinson, S. J.
Conference name Queensland University of Technology Research Week International Conference (2005 : Brisbane, Queensland)
Conference location Brisbane, Queensland
Conference dates 4-8 July 2005
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the Queensland University of Technology Research Week International Conference, 4-5 July 2005, Brisbane, Queensland
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2005
Conference series Queensland University of Technology Research Week International Conference
Publisher Queensland University of Technology
Place of publication Brisbane, Qld.
Keyword(s) built environment
higher education
women
culture
comparative study
Summary This study provides a case study of two higher educational institutions and their built environment discipline academic culture, with a specific focus on the impact of culture on the participation of females in the subject area. The two institutions, whilst both delivering built environment programmes, are very different. One is in the UK and is a new university, and the other is in Australia and in the top 200 universities of the world (THES, 2004). Comparative studies have become fashionable as a way of determining policy (Broadfoot, 2001) yet it is still important to acknowledge the character of the national policy within which the culture exists. Culture is a concept used to try and indicate the "climate and practices" developed within an organization to handle people, together with the values of the organization (Schein, 1997, p 3). The academic tribes have been described by Becher and Trowler (2001) in some detail, and they acknowledge the huge range of external forces now acting on academic cultures including a diversification of subject areas and the impact of gender on subject areas. Built environment education has traditionally been a gendered (male dominated) subject area and is making efforts to change (Greed, 1999; Turrell, Wilkinson, Astle and Yeo, 2002). The study will try to identify the cultural attributes that exist in each of the two built environment departments and programmes drawing on the signs and symbols that indicate the culture as well as drawing on staff / student experience. A comparative study will be carried out to determine differences and similarities, and potential lessons to be learned by each institution .
ISBN 9781741071016
1741071011
Language eng
Field of Research 120103 Architectural History and Theory
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2005, Queensland University of Technology, School of Engineering Systems
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022405

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.