Openly accessible

Australia's strengths and weaknesses in technology transfer and R&D exploitation : GEM survey "experts" views compared with public policy and other published data

Yencken, John, Rushworth, Susan and Hindle, Kevin 2004, Australia's strengths and weaknesses in technology transfer and R&D exploitation : GEM survey "experts" views compared with public policy and other published data, in AGSE 2004 : Regional frontiers of entrepreneurship research 2004 : proceedings of the first annual regional entrepreneurship research exchange, Swinburne University of Technology, The Australian Graduate School of Entrepreneurship, Hawthorn, Vic., pp. 217-240.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
hindle-australiasstrengthsand-2004.pdf Published version application/pdf 2.21MB 34

Title Australia's strengths and weaknesses in technology transfer and R&D exploitation : GEM survey "experts" views compared with public policy and other published data
Author(s) Yencken, John
Rushworth, Susan
Hindle, Kevin
Conference name Regional Entrepreneurship Research Exchange (1st : 2004 : Melbourne, Victoria)
Conference location Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 24-25 February 2004
Title of proceedings AGSE 2004 : Regional frontiers of entrepreneurship research 2004 : proceedings of the first annual regional entrepreneurship research exchange
Editor(s) Murray, Gillin L.
Butler, John
Douglas, Evan
Hindle, Kevin
La Pira, Frank
Lindsay, Noel
Shepherd, Dean
Yencken, John
Shaker, Zara
Publication date 2004
Conference series Regional Entrepreneurship Research Exchange
Start page 217
End page 240
Total pages 24
Publisher Swinburne University of Technology, The Australian Graduate School of Entrepreneurship
Place of publication Hawthorn, Vic.
Summary There has been increasing public debate in Australia in recent years about research culture in universities and other publicly funded research agencies such as CSIRO and its impact on Australia's performance in generating economic, social and environmental benefits to the Australian community from the large amount of public funding for R&D. This is the supply side issue. On the demand side there is equally concern about the technology absorptive capacity of Australian. business as illustrated by the low proportion of gross business research expenditure (GERD) spent by business (BERD). Against this background, this paper has explored the views of abut 100 "experts" interviewed in the Australian Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) studies in the years 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2003 on the issues, strengths and weaknesses of Australia's technology transfer performance as it applies to new technology small firms. The paper has also explored evidence for any longitudinal change over this period.
Notes
Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in Deakin Research Online. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au

ISBN 9780855908072
0855908076
Language eng
Field of Research 150304 Entrepreneurship
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2004, Swinburne University of Technology, AGSE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022441

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 902 Abstract Views, 34 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 18 Jan 2010, 13:25:51 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.