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Patient safety ethics and human error management in ED contexts Part II : Accountability and the challenge to change

Johnstone, Megan-Jane 2007, Patient safety ethics and human error management in ED contexts Part II : Accountability and the challenge to change, Australasian emergency nursing journal, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 80-85, doi: 10.1016/j.aenj.2006.11.001.

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Title Patient safety ethics and human error management in ED contexts Part II : Accountability and the challenge to change
Author(s) Johnstone, Megan-Jane
Journal name Australasian emergency nursing journal
Volume number 10
Issue number 2
Start page 80
End page 85
Publisher Elsevier Ltd
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2007-05
ISSN 1574-6267
Keyword(s) patient safety
human error
adverse events
clinical risk management
ethics
emergency departments
Summary In recent years there has been increasing recognition internationally that health care is not as safe as it ought to be and that patient safety outcomes need to be improved. To this end, patient safety has become the focus of a world-wide endeavour – endorsed by the World Health Organisation – to reduce the incidence and impact of preventable human errors and related adverse events in health care domains. The emergency department has been identified as a significant site of preventable human errors and adverse events in the health care system, raising important questions about the nature of human error management and patient safety ethics in rapidly changing environments, of which the Emergency Department is a prime example. In Part I of this article series, an overview of the incidence and impact of preventable adverse events in Emergency Department contexts and the development of the global patient safety movement was presented. In this second article brief attention is given to examining some of the ethical tensions that have arisen in response to the patient safety movement and their possible implications for Emergency Department contexts and staff.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.aenj.2006.11.001
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022489

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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