Fundamental movement skills - How do primary school children perform? The 'Move it Groove it' program in rural Australia

van Beurden, E., Zask, A., Barnett, L.M. and Dietrich, U.C. 2002, Fundamental movement skills - How do primary school children perform? The 'Move it Groove it' program in rural Australia, Journal of science and medicine in sport, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 244-252.


Title Fundamental movement skills - How do primary school children perform? The 'Move it Groove it' program in rural Australia
Author(s) van Beurden, E.
Zask, A.
Barnett, L.M.
Dietrich, U.C.
Journal name Journal of science and medicine in sport
Volume number 5
Issue number 3
Start page 244
End page 252
Publisher Elsevier Australia
Place of publication Chatswood, N.S.W.
Publication date 2002-09
ISSN 1440-2440
Summary Child Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS) underpin active lifestyles yet little is known of their distribution and mastery.

‘Move it Groove it’ project rated proficiency of primary school children (n=1045, 18 schools) in skills of balance, throw, catch, sprint, hop, kick, side gallop and jump. Rating categories were ‘mastery’, ‘near mastery’ or ‘poor’ (ie mastered all, all but one, or less of the five to six components of an FMS).

Less than half of all child tests were rated at mastery (21.3%) or near mastery (25.7%) level. In grade three, 75.4% of children achieved mastery or near mastery (MNM) in static balance but less than half did so for any other FMS. In grade four, 59.0% achieved MNM in the side gallop and 56.0% in the catch but less than half did so for any other FMS.

Although the highest percent mastery for both genders was for the balance, the skills best performed thereafter by boys (throw and kick) rated poorest for girls. Conversely the hop and side gallop which rated, after balance, as the skills best mastered by girls, were among the more poorly performed skills for boys.

The low prevalence of FMS mastery found in this survey suggests that there may be great potential to improve fundamental movement skills of primary aged children in many parts of rural Australia. Even if the aim were for children to achieve near mastery levels, the improvement could be substantial in every skill category. Where appropriate, gender differences in mastery might easily be addressed by tailored physical education programs and modification of social and physical environments.
Language eng
Field of Research 111704 Community Child Health
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2002, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022519

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 28 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 31 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 479 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 19 Jan 2010, 13:52:56 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.