Getting the complete picture : combining parental and child data to identify the barriers to social inclusion for children living in low socio-economic areas

Davies, Belinda, Davis, Elise, Cook, Kay and Waters, Elizabeth 2008, Getting the complete picture : combining parental and child data to identify the barriers to social inclusion for children living in low socio-economic areas, Child : care, health and development, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 214-222.

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Title Getting the complete picture : combining parental and child data to identify the barriers to social inclusion for children living in low socio-economic areas
Author(s) Davies, Belinda
Davis, Elise
Cook, Kay
Waters, Elizabeth
Journal name Child : care, health and development
Volume number 34
Issue number 2
Start page 214
End page 222
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2008-03
ISSN 0305-1862
1365-2214
Keyword(s) mental health and parent–child report
social exclusion
social inclusion
Summary Background: Childhood mental health problems are prevalent in Australian children (14–20%). Social exclusion is a risk factor for mental health problems, whereas being socially included can have protective effects. This study aims to identify the barriers to social inclusion for children aged 9–12 years living in low socio-economic status (SES) areas, using both child-report and parent-report interviews.

Methods: Australian-born English-speaking parents and children aged 9–12 years were sampled from a low SES area to participate in semi-structured interviews. Parents and children were asked questions around three prominent themes of social exclusion; exclusion from school, social activities and social networks.

Results: Many children experienced social exclusion at school, from social activities or within social networks. Overall, nine key barriers to social inclusion were identified through parent and child interviews, such as inability to attend school camps and participate in school activities, bullying and being left out, time and transport constraints, financial constraints and safety and traffic concerns. Parents and children often identified different barriers.

Discussion: There are several barriers to social inclusion for children living in low SES communities, many of which can be used to facilitate mental health promotion programmes. Given that parents and children may report different barriers, it is important to seek both perspectives.

Conclusion: This study strengthens the evidence base for the investments and action required to bring about the conditions for social inclusion for children living in low SES communities.
Language eng
Field of Research 169999 Studies in Human Society not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920206 Health Inequalities
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022523

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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