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Effect of materials on the urban thermal environment a CFD simulation approach

Rajagopalan, Priyadarsini and Wong, N. H. 2004, Effect of materials on the urban thermal environment a CFD simulation approach, in PLEA 2004 : Built environments and environmental buildings : 21st International Conference on Passive and Low Energy Architecture, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 19-22 September 2004 : conference proceedings, Organizing Committee of PLEA, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, pp. 421-426.

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Title Effect of materials on the urban thermal environment a CFD simulation approach
Author(s) Rajagopalan, Priyadarsini
Wong, N. H.
Conference name Passive and Low Energy Architecture. Conference (21st : 2004 : Eindhoven, The Netherlands)
Conference location Technical University of Eindhoven
Conference dates 19-22 September 2004
Title of proceedings PLEA 2004 : Built environments and environmental buildings : 21st International Conference on Passive and Low Energy Architecture, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 19-22 September 2004 : conference proceedings
Editor(s) de Wit, M. H.
Publication date 2004
Conference series International Conference on Passive and Low Energy Architecture
Start page 421
End page 426
Publisher Organizing Committee of PLEA
Place of publication Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Keyword(s) CBD area
materials
surface temperature
CFD Simulations
wind speed
Summary Use of high albedo materials reduces the amount of solar radiation absorbed through building envelops and urban structures and thus keeping their surfaces cooler. The cooling energy savings by using high albedo materials have been well documented. Higher surface temperatures add to increasing the ambient temperature as convection intensity is higher. Such temperature increase has significant impacts on the air conditioning energy utilization in hot climates. This study makes use of a parametric approach by varying the temperature of building facades to represent commonly used materials and hence analyzing its effect on the air temperature through a series of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations. A part of the existing CBD (Central Business District) area of Singapore was selected for the study. Series of CFD simulations have been carried out using the software CFX-5.6. Wind tunnel experiments were also conducted for validation. It was found that at low wind speeds, the effect of materials on the air temperature was significant and the temperature at the middle of a narrow canyon increased up to 2.52°C with the façade material having lowest albedo.
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Language eng
Field of Research 120202 Building Science and Techniques
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2004, 2004, Organizing Committee of PLEA'2004
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022600

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.