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A new screen face for public service broadcasting

Cinque, Toija 2009, A new screen face for public service broadcasting, in ANZCA 2009 : Proceedings of the 2009 Australian and New Zealand Communication Association Conference : Communication, creativity and global citizenship, ANZCA, [Brisbane, Qld.], pp. 534-545.

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Title A new screen face for public service broadcasting
Author(s) Cinque, ToijaORCID iD for Cinque, Toija orcid.org/0000-0001-9845-3953
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Communication Association. Conference (2009 : Brisbane, Queensland)
Conference location Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland
Conference dates 8 - 10 July 2009
Title of proceedings ANZCA 2009 : Proceedings of the 2009 Australian and New Zealand Communication Association Conference : Communication, creativity and global citizenship
Editor(s) Flew, Terry
Publication date 2009
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Communication Association Conference
Start page 534
End page 545
Total pages 12
Publisher ANZCA
Place of publication [Brisbane, Qld.]
Keyword(s) public service broadcasting
television
new media
online
Summary The contemporary broadcasting industry is characterised by technological and social change, it is increasingly competitive, and the media industry is fragmenting. New services need not necessarily compete with existing free-to-air broadcasting but could act as further incentive for audiences to invest in new equipment. New equipment will be necessary in the future as set out under the Television Broadcasting Services (Digital Conversion) Act 2000 (Cth), before the planned switch-off of analogue broadcasts planned for this year but now likely to be 2013. By then, however, audiences might already have migrated to the online environment for television and radio content as well as other services. Those that produce and deliver programs via free-to-air broadcasting need to consider what audiences do with new media in order to engage them. This will be an ongoing process as technology and audience expectations continue to change. Against such a background, this article examines how Australia’s public broadcasters are responding to the new media environment. It will consider their interactive online programs and services with specific analysis of ABC’s new ‘iView’ and ‘ABC Fora’ which offer content on-demand. It will also examine SBS online initiatives. I wish to argue that the new media offer public broadcasters new prospects to provide forums and spaces for education, entertainment, public discussion and interaction online.
Notes
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ISBN 9781741072754
Language eng
Field of Research 200199 Communication and Media Studies not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 950299 Communication not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2009, ANZCA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022639

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.