Different sounds, different musics, different teaching : an Australian case study in multicultural teaching and learning

Joseph, Dawn and Southcott, Jane 2010, Different sounds, different musics, different teaching : an Australian case study in multicultural teaching and learning, in CDIME 2010 : Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Cultural Diversity in Music Education : The cultural aesthetics of teaching, Sydney Conservatorium of Music, Sydney, N.S.W., pp. 76-81.

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Title Different sounds, different musics, different teaching : an Australian case study in multicultural teaching and learning
Author(s) Joseph, Dawn
Southcott, Jane
Conference name International Conference on Cultural Diversity in Music Education (10th : 2010 : Sydney, New South Wales)
Conference location Sydney, New South Wales
Conference dates 11 - 13 January 2010
Title of proceedings CDIME 2010 : Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Cultural Diversity in Music Education : The cultural aesthetics of teaching
Editor(s) Dunbar-Hill, Peter
Publication date 2010
Conference series Cultural Diversity in Music Education Conference
Start page 76
End page 81
Publisher Sydney Conservatorium of Music
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Summary This single case study is part of a wider ongoing research project, begun in 2005, entitled Intercultural attitudes of pre-service music education students from Deakin University and Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. One participant selected from the entire cohort and reinterviewed in 2009 as it was apparent that his experience and expertise outstripped all the others. This paper explores the tensions between authentic pedagogical practice, as understood by the interviewee, in community teaching and in a school. The data generated were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three major themes were identified: benefits of community music making, authentic learning, and reality of class music practice. The data demonstrate that authentic socio-cultural understanding is achievable in community music teaching, particularly in the honoring of what individuals bring the sharing of expertise between ensemble players and valuing community arts practice. However, as this is a case study demonstrates, at least in some schools, there is a lack of understanding of how multicultural music could and should be taught. Australian schools should encourage teachers who bring different sounds, different musics and different teaching into the classroom thus resolving to some degree, the potential mismatches between culturally developed learning styles and music teaching methods.
ISBN 9780646521565
Language eng
Field of Research 130201 Creative Arts, Media and Communication Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 950204 The Media
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2010, CDIME
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022681

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Education
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