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The relationship between job status, interviewing experience, gender, and police officers' adherence to open-ended questions

Smith, Rebecca M., Powell, Martine B. and Lum, Jarrad 2009, The relationship between job status, interviewing experience, gender, and police officers' adherence to open-ended questions, Legal and criminological psychology, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 51-63, doi: 10.1348/135532507X262360.

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Title The relationship between job status, interviewing experience, gender, and police officers' adherence to open-ended questions
Author(s) Smith, Rebecca M.
Powell, Martine B.ORCID iD for Powell, Martine B. orcid.org/0000-0001-5092-1308
Lum, JarradORCID iD for Lum, Jarrad orcid.org/0000-0003-2098-2403
Journal name Legal and criminological psychology
Volume number 14
Issue number 1
Start page 51
End page 63
Total pages 13
Publisher British Psychological Society
Place of publication Leicester, England
Publication date 2009-02
ISSN 1355-3259
2044-8333
Summary Purpose : The current study examined whether several factors related to the job and demographic profile of police officers are associated with adherence to best-practice guidelines when interviewing children.

Method : One hundred and seventy-eight police officers completed a standardized (simulated) interview regarding an allegation of abuse by a 5-year-old child. Immediately prior to this interview, details were obtained from the officers' regarding their job status, gender, interview experience, the timing and nature of prior training/supervision, and experience outside the policing profession with young children.

Results : The results showed that timing of training was the only factor that related to interview performance. The proportion of open-ended questions among participants who completed their interviewer training course less than 1 month prior to the simulated interview was better than those who completed the training earlier. Interestingly, the performance of the latter group was identical to that of a group of participants who had not yet received any formal interview training. The implications of the findings are discussed, along with directions for future research.
Language eng
DOI 10.1348/135532507X262360
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, The British Psychological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30022804

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
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Created: Fri, 29 Jan 2010, 09:22:44 EST by Sally Morrigan

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