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The spatial pattern of natural selection when selection depends upon experience

Endler, John A. and Rojas, Bibiana 2009, The spatial pattern of natural selection when selection depends upon experience, American naturalist, vol. 173, no. 3, pp. 62-78, doi: 10.1086/596528.

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Title The spatial pattern of natural selection when selection depends upon experience
Author(s) Endler, John A.ORCID iD for Endler, John A. orcid.org/0000-0002-7557-7627
Rojas, Bibiana
Journal name American naturalist
Volume number 173
Issue number 3
Start page 62
End page 78
Total pages 17
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Place of publication Chicago, Ill.
Publication date 2009-03
ISSN 0003-0147
1537-5323
Keyword(s) aposematism
sexual selection
polymorphism
mate search
mate choice
frequency dependence
dispersion
density dependence
apostatic selection
Summary Apostatic (frequency‐ or density‐dependent) selection, aposematic signals, and mate choice behavior generally require that the mean prey or potential mate density m value be high enough (above a threshold T) to result in sufficient encounter rates for the searcher to learn or retain the association between conspicuous signals and prey unprofitability, to forage apostatically, or to choose among mates. This assumes that all searchers experience , which implicitly assumes an even dispersion of targets among searcher territories. Uneven dispersion generates new phenomena. If , then only territories with local density x values that are greater than T favor experience‐based behavior, leading to spatially variable frequency‐ or density‐dependent selection intensity. As aggregation increases, the increase in percentage of targets in favorable territories ( ) is greater than the increase in the percentage of territories that are favorable. The relationship is reversed when . In both cases, because as few as 10% of the territories can contain 80% of the targets, only a few territory holders may account for most of the selection on most of the target population; accidents of experience in only a few searchers can have unexpectedly large effects on the target population. This also provides an explanation for high searcher behavior variation (personalities) : individuals from favorable territories will behave differently in behavioral experiments than those from unfavorable territories, at least with respect to similar kinds of targets. These effects will generate spatial heterogeneity in natural and sexual selection in what are otherwise uniform environments.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1086/596528
Field of Research 059999 Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, The University of Chicago
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30023051

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.