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Perceptions and experiences of taking oral hypoglycaemic agents among people of Pakistani and Indian origin : qualitative study

Lawton, Julia, Ahmad, Naureen, Hallowell, Nina, Hanna, Lisa and Douglas, Margaret 2005, Perceptions and experiences of taking oral hypoglycaemic agents among people of Pakistani and Indian origin : qualitative study, BMJ, vol. 330, no. 7502, pp. 1247-1250, doi: 10.1136/bmj.38460.642789.E0.

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Title Perceptions and experiences of taking oral hypoglycaemic agents among people of Pakistani and Indian origin : qualitative study
Author(s) Lawton, Julia
Ahmad, Naureen
Hallowell, Nina
Hanna, LisaORCID iD for Hanna, Lisa orcid.org/0000-0003-3173-3381
Douglas, Margaret
Journal name BMJ
Volume number 330
Issue number 7502
Start page 1247
End page 1250
Total pages 3
Publisher BMJ group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2005
ISSN 0959-535X
1468-5833
Summary Objective:  To explore British Pakistani and British Indian patients’ perceptions and experiences of taking oral hypoglycaemic agents (OHAs).
Design : Observational cross sectional study using in-depth interviews in English or Punjabi.
Setting and participants : 32 patients of Pakistani and Indian origin with type 2 diabetes, recruited from primary care and community sources in Edinburgh, Scotland.
Results : Respondents reported complex and ambivalent views about OHAs, which reflected their ambivalent attitudes towards Western drugs in general. Respondents considered OHAs to be an important part of the diabetic regimen because they perceived British healthcare professionals to be competent and trustworthy prescribers, and they considered the medicines available in Britain to be superior to those on the Indian subcontinent. Despite this, some respondents made deliberate efforts to reduce their tablet intake without being advised to do so. Reasons for this included perceptions that drugs worked by providing relief of symptoms and concerns that OHAs could be detrimental to health if taken for long periods, in conjunction with other drugs, or without traditional foods.
Conclusions : British Pakistani and Indian patients’ perceptions of their OHAs may partly derive from popular ideas about drugs on the Indian subcontinent. Cultural factors need to be understood and taken into consideration to ensure that these patients are given appropriate advice and to avoid unnecessary changes to prescriptions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmj.38460.642789.E0
Field of Research 111102 Dietetics and Nutrigenomics
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, BMJ Group
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30023701

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.