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Thresholds, incidence functions, and species-specific cues : responses of woodland birds to landscape structure in south-eastern Australia

Bennett, Andrew F. and Radford, James Q. 2009, Thresholds, incidence functions, and species-specific cues : responses of woodland birds to landscape structure in south-eastern Australia. In Villard, Marc-André and Jonsson, Bengt Gunnar (ed), Setting conservation targets for managed forest landscapes, Cambridge University Press, New York, N. Y., pp.161-184.

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Title Thresholds, incidence functions, and species-specific cues : responses of woodland birds to landscape structure in south-eastern Australia
Author(s) Bennett, Andrew F.
Radford, James Q.
Title of book Setting conservation targets for managed forest landscapes
Editor(s) Villard, Marc-André
Jonsson, Bengt Gunnar
Publication date 2009
Series Conservation Biology 16
Chapter number 8
Total chapters 18
Start page 161
End page 184
Total pages 24
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of Publication New York, N. Y.
Keyword(s) South-Eastern Australia
managed forest landscapes
woodland birds
conservation of biodiversity
thresholds
species-specific cues
Summary Looking out from a vantage point across a large tract of forest gives a superficial impression of uniformity: the crowns of canopy trees follow the folds and contours of the landscape to provide a continuous cover of wooded vegetation. But this visual appearance belies the truth: forested landscapes are far from uniform. On closer examination, they comprise a complex mosaic of different vegetation types and and stands of different age-classes, differing structural features, and modified to a varying extent by human land-uses. Forests have a critical role in the conservation of biodiversity throughout the world (Peterken 1996; Laurance and Bierregard 1997; Lindenmayer and Franklin 2002) and a key feature contributing to their conservation value is the response of forest biota to the heterogeneity inherent in forested landscapes (Lindenmayer et al. 2006). Consequently, an understanding of the implications of landscape structure for the maintainance of species and ecological processes is an important foundation for forest management and biodiversity conservation.
ISBN 9780521877091
0521877091
Language eng
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 050104 Landscape Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 960505 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Forest and Woodlands Environments
HERDC Research category B1 Book chapter
Copyright notice ©2009, Cambridge University Press
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2010-07-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30023711

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.