Openly accessible

Rewriting Australian planning from the margins

Johnson, Louise 2010, Rewriting Australian planning from the margins, in UHPH 2010 : Proceedings of the 10th Australasian Urban History, Planning History Conference : Green Fields, Brown Fields, New Fields, University Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 261-273.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
johnson-rewritingaustralian-2010.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.14MB 143

Title Rewriting Australian planning from the margins
Author(s) Johnson, LouiseORCID iD for Johnson, Louise orcid.org/0000-0002-0934-3339
Conference name Australasian Urban History/Planning History Conference (10th : 2010 : University of Melbourne, Victoria)
Conference location University of Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 7th-10th Feb. 2010
Title of proceedings UHPH 2010 : Proceedings of the 10th Australasian Urban History, Planning History Conference : Green Fields, Brown Fields, New Fields
Editor(s) Nichols, David
Hurlimann, Anna
Mouat, Clare
Pascoe, Stephen
Publication date 2010
Conference series Australasian Urban History and Planning History Conference
Start page 261
End page 273
Total pages 13
Publisher University Melbourne
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary If planning is the conscious formulation of a preferred.future and deliberate actions to realise that future in the landscape, then Indigenous Australians have long been involved in planning settlements and regions. Yet such actions - pre and post-contact - are absent from the history of Australian planning, as evidenced by some major texts on the subject. That also passes without serious comment in the planning literature and contemporary practice are the theoretical implications of admitting key aspects of recent Indigenous history - such as prior occupancy, ongoing sovereignty, resistance strategies, ghettoisation and Native Title. There are, therefore, significant gaps in the history and theory of Australian planning which impact negatively on its current teaching and practice. The consequences of such omissions range.from incomplete histories to ongoing injustices in Australian planning practice. My larger research project will collate these absences before reworking the history of Australian planning from the perspective of those systematically excluded from it -women, migrants from racially marked non-white backgrounds and Indigenous Australians. This paper will consider only a small part of this larger project. It will first examine some of the key texts which construct the history of Australian planning before examining one place - Lake Condah in Western Victoria - as one site of permanent settlement by the Gundijmara people who lived in stone houses arrayed in villages around an engineered sophisticated fish farming enterprise. Here then is but one example - admittedly subject to contestation over its scale, anthropological and archaeological fundamentals - which challenges the view of indigenous Australians as not only nomadic and "primitive" but also as legitimately placed outside the history of Australian planning. I will conclude by speculating on what this example might mean to any reworking of that history.
ISBN 9780734041579
Language eng
Field of Research 120502 History and Theory of the Built Environment (excl Architecture)
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2010, The Author
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30023731

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of History, Heritage and Society
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 793 Abstract Views, 147 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 16 Feb 2010, 15:40:20 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.