Communities of practice in Academe (CoP-iA) : understanding academic work practices to enable knowledge building capacities in corporate universities

Nagy, Judy and Burch, Tony 2009, Communities of practice in Academe (CoP-iA) : understanding academic work practices to enable knowledge building capacities in corporate universities, Oxford review of education, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 227-247.

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Title Communities of practice in Academe (CoP-iA) : understanding academic work practices to enable knowledge building capacities in corporate universities
Author(s) Nagy, Judy
Burch, Tony
Journal name Oxford review of education
Volume number 35
Issue number 2
Start page 227
End page 247
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2009-04
ISSN 0305-4985
1465-3915
Summary A form of voluntary workplace engagement, communities of practice are characterised in literature as providing entities with the potential to harness the multiplier effects of collaborative processes by building on informal networks within entities. As knowledge building and sharing institutions it would be reasonable to presume that communities of practice activities have been embraced to facilitate a level of connectedness and engagement in a university context. However, evidence from the Australian higher education environment suggests that the enlistment of communities of practice processes by universities faces a number of challenges that are peculiar to academe. We suggest that academic knowledge work practices are significantly different from the business/industry related applications of communities of practice and that an understanding of the unique aspects of such practices, together with the impediments posed by a 'corporate university' model, require acknowledgment before the knowledge building and sharing aspects of communities of practice activities in academia can emerge.
Language eng
Field of Research 130103 Higher Education
Socio Economic Objective 939999 Education and Training not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30023836

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Business and Law
Deakin Graduate School of Business
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