The construction of the racially different indigenous offender

Spivakovsky, Claire 2009, The construction of the racially different indigenous offender, in C3 2009 : Proceedings of 2009 Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference, Monash University, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 215-227.

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Title The construction of the racially different indigenous offender
Author(s) Spivakovsky, Claire
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference (2009 : Melbourne, Victoria)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic
Conference dates 8 - 9 July, 2009
Title of proceedings C3 2009 : Proceedings of 2009 Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference
Editor(s) Segrave, Marie
Publication date 2009
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference
Start page 215
End page 227
Total pages 305 p.
Publisher Monash University
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary The over‐representation and increased growth of Indigenous offenders in all Western criminal justice systems is longstanding and undeniable. In 2006 Victoria’s Koori offenders were 12 times more likely to be sentenced to a custodial or community sanction than non‐Koori people. Similarly, in New Zealand, Maori men account for 50 percent of the prison population but only 12.5 percent of the general population. Yet, it was not until the 1990s that the issues of Indigenous over‐representation or expanding Indigenous offender populations began to be presented as a problem within the correctional literature. This paper will explore the parameters of these ‘problems’, and present the following three arguments: (1) the issues of over‐representation was constructed within the correctional literature as a symptom of the different nature of Indigenous offending; (2) the different nature of Indigenous offending was in turn constructed as a problem of race; and (3) this construction of Indigenous offending is consistent with the contemporary constitution of mainstream offending behaviour. In concluding, this paper will discuss the implications of the emergence and sustained production of this figure of the Indigenous offender in relation to the capacity of criminologists to reconceptualise Indigenous offending.
Notes This paper is located on the 215th page in the attached link.
ISBN 9780980753004
Language eng
Field of Research 160202 Correctional Theory, Offender Treatment and Rehabilitation
Socio Economic Objective 940408 Rehabilitation and Correctional Services
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2009, Monash University
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30023896

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of History, Heritage and Society
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