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Is life history a barrier to dispersal? Contrasting patterns of genetic differentiation along an oceanographically complex coast

Sherman, Craig D. H., Hunt, Alison and Ayre, David J . 2008, Is life history a barrier to dispersal? Contrasting patterns of genetic differentiation along an oceanographically complex coast, Biological journal of the Linnean Society, vol. 95, no. 1, pp. 106-116, doi: 10.1111/j.1095-8312.2008.01044.x.

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Title Is life history a barrier to dispersal? Contrasting patterns of genetic differentiation along an oceanographically complex coast
Author(s) Sherman, Craig D. H.ORCID iD for Sherman, Craig D. H. orcid.org/0000-0003-2099-0462
Hunt, Alison
Ayre, David J .
Journal name Biological journal of the Linnean Society
Volume number 95
Issue number 1
Start page 106
End page 116
Total pages 11
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2008
ISSN 0024-4066
1095-8312
Summary Extreme variation in early life-history strategies is considered a moderately good predictor of genetic subdivision and hence dispersal for a range of marine species. In reality, however, a good deal of population differentiation must reflect historical effects, more subtle variation in life histories, and, particularly, the interaction of larvae with oceanographic processes. Using a combination of allozyme and microsatellite markers, we show that the large-scale genetic structure of populations of three species (direct and planktonically developing cushion stars and a planktonic developing sea anemone that is also asexually viviparous) varies consistently, in line with the predicted capacity for dispersal within three geographic regions. We detected high levels of genetic subdivision for the direct developing cushion star (FST = 0.6), low levels for the planktonically developing cushion star (FST = 0.009), and intermediate levels for the sexual/asexual sea anmone (FST = 0.19). These patterns are exhibited despite the highly variable patterns of current movement and the presence of biogeographic barriers. Our results suggest that, although there is large scale genetic differentiation for two species, patterns of population connectivity are remarkably consistent within major regions and do not reflect variation in major oceanographic processes or genetic discontinuity coincident with biogeographic boundaries.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1095-8312.2008.01044.x
Field of Research 060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, The Linnean Society of London
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30024138

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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