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Editorial : the construction of academic literacy and difference

Kostogriz, Alex and Godley, Amanda 2007, Editorial : the construction of academic literacy and difference, English teaching : practice and critique, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 1-7.

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Title Editorial : the construction of academic literacy and difference
Author(s) Kostogriz, Alex
Godley, Amanda
Journal name English teaching : practice and critique
Volume number 6
Issue number 2
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher School of Education, University of Waikato
Place of publication Hamilton, N.Z.
Publication date 2007-09
ISSN 1175-8708
Summary In recent years, academic literacy has been a subject of heated scholarly and political debates. How academic literacy is defined, whom it serves, and what its purposes are shape both educational policies and the pedagogical practices adopted in classrooms. Any definition of academic literacy, its purposes and its learners also constructs powerful notions of difference. For instance, many traditional definitions of academic literacy posit “out of school” literacy (or literacies) as its opposite; current literacy standards and performance measures create categories of students as able or struggling; and so on. At a time when English classrooms around the world are becoming more multicultural, multilingual and international, how might understandings of academic literacy respond to cultural, linguistic, gender, economic, (dis)ability and other differences? How can literacy be taught to difference without reducing it to sameness? Framing the curriculum around dominant cultural literacy and establishing communal homogeneity, whilst de-legitimizing the Other and announcing ever-new strangers, is not feasible in a new multilingual, multiculural order. There is an increasing need to resist conservative tendencies and to continue a socially critical model of literacy education that is more response-able to the lives of strangers and other forms of difference in a late-modern, globalized society at the same time that it provides opportunities for all students to expand their communicative repertoires and to gain agency in the “design of their social futures” (New London Group, 2000). Articles in this issue respond in different ways to this agenda.
Notes Reproduced with kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 130204 English and Literacy Curriculum and Pedagogy (excl LOTE, ESL and TESOL)
HERDC Research category C4.1 Letter or note
Copyright notice ©2007, The authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30024393

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Education
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