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Bridging the divide: a survey of nurses' opinions regarding barriers to, and facilitators of, research utilization in the practice setting

Hutchinson, Alison Margaret and Johnston, Linda 2004, Bridging the divide: a survey of nurses' opinions regarding barriers to, and facilitators of, research utilization in the practice setting, Journal of clinical nursing, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 304-315, doi: 10.1046/j.1365-2702.2003.00865.x.

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Title Bridging the divide: a survey of nurses' opinions regarding barriers to, and facilitators of, research utilization in the practice setting
Author(s) Hutchinson, Alison MargaretORCID iD for Hutchinson, Alison Margaret orcid.org/0000-0001-5065-2726
Johnston, Linda
Journal name Journal of clinical nursing
Volume number 13
Issue number 3
Start page 304
End page 315
Total pages 12
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2004-03
ISSN 0962-1067
1365-2702
Summary Background. Many researchers have explored the barriers to research uptake in order to overcome them and identify strategies to facilitate research utilization. However, the research–practice gap remains a persistent issue for the nursing profession.

Aims and objectives. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of perceived influences on nurses' utilization of research, and explore what differences or commonalities exist between the findings of this research and those of studies that have been conducted in various countries during the past 10 years.

Design. Nurses were surveyed to elicit their opinions regarding barriers to, and facilitators of, research utilization. The instrument comprised a 29-item validated questionnaire, titled Barriers to Research Utilisation Scale (BARRIERS Scale), an eight-item scale of facilitators, provision for respondents to record additional barriers and/or facilitators and a series of demographic questions.

Method. The questionnaire was administered in 2001 to all nurses (n = 761) working at a major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A 45% response rate was achieved.

Results. Greatest barriers to research utilization reported included time constraints, lack of awareness of available research literature, insufficient authority to change practice, inadequate skills in critical appraisal and lack of support for implementation of research findings. Greatest facilitators to research utilization reported included availability of more time to review and implement research findings, availability of more relevant research and colleague support.

Conclusion. One of the most striking features of the findings of the present study is that perceptions of Australian nurses are remarkably consistent with reported perceptions of nurses in the US, UK and Northern Ireland during the past decade.

Relevance to clinical practice. If the use of research evidence in practice results in better outcomes for our patients, this behoves us, as a profession, to address issues surrounding support for implementation of research findings, authority to change practice, time constraints and ability to critically appraise research with conviction and a sense of urgency.
Language eng
DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2702.2003.00865.x
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
130213 Vocational Education and Training Curriculum and Pedagogy
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30024561

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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