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Frequency of shearing increases growth of fibre and changes objective and subjective attributes of Angora goat fleeces

McGregor, B. A. and Butler, K. L. 2008, Frequency of shearing increases growth of fibre and changes objective and subjective attributes of Angora goat fleeces, Journal of agricultural science, vol. 146, no. 3, pp. 351-361, doi: 10.1017/S0021859607007599.

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Title Frequency of shearing increases growth of fibre and changes objective and subjective attributes of Angora goat fleeces
Author(s) McGregor, B. A.ORCID iD for McGregor, B. A. orcid.org/0000-0002-4574-4236
Butler, K. L.
Journal name Journal of agricultural science
Volume number 146
Issue number 3
Start page 351
End page 361
Total pages 11
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2008-06
ISSN 0021-8596
1469-5146
Summary The impact of genotype and of frequency and timing of shearing, on mohair attributes and production of modern Angora goats was studied. Goats in the southern hemisphere grazed pastures between February 2004 and 2006. There were seven shearing treatments by three genetic strains with four or eight replicates of individual goats. Treatments were: three different 6-month shearing intervals and two of 12-month shearing intervals with different months of shearing, a 7-month winter shearing interval and a 3-month shearing interval. Genetic strain was based on sire line: 1·0 South African; 1·0 Texan; and Mixed 0·5 South African and 0·5 Texan. Annual greasy mohair production was 5·08 kg, and average clean fleece production was 4·37 kg. The Angora goats produced an annual clean fleece equivalent to 0·122 of their mean fleece-free live weight which was equal to 0·34 g/kg/day. Measurements were analysed over the period of spring 2004 shearing to spring 2005 shearing, excluding the June–December shearing treatment. Increased frequency of shearing increased fleece growth and affected 13 objective and subjective attributes of mohair that were evaluated including clean washing yield, fibre diameter and fibre diameter variation, incidence of medullated fibres, staple length, fibre curvature, crimp frequency, style, staple definition, staple fibre entanglement and staple tip shape. The direction of these effects were generally favourable and for most attributes the magnitude of the response was linear and commercially important. Each additional shearing resulted in an additional 149 g of clean mohair representing 0·034 of the annual clean mohair production. This increase was associated with a 0·6 cm increase in staple length and 0·32 μm increase in mean fibre diameter. In conclusion, Angora goats shorn less frequently grew less mohair that was more likely to be entangled in spring. Managers of Angora goats should take note of these findings.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0021859607007599
Field of Research 070203 Animal Management
Socio Economic Objective 970107 Expanding Knowledge in the Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30024583

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.