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Processing and quality of cashmere tops for ultra-fine wool worsted blend fabrics

McGregor, B. A. and Postle, R. 2004, Processing and quality of cashmere tops for ultra-fine wool worsted blend fabrics, International journal of clothing science and technology, vol. 16, no. 1-2, pp. 119-131, doi: 10.1108/09556220410520414.

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Title Processing and quality of cashmere tops for ultra-fine wool worsted blend fabrics
Author(s) McGregor, B. A.ORCID iD for McGregor, B. A. orcid.org/0000-0002-4574-4236
Postle, R.
Journal name International journal of clothing science and technology
Volume number 16
Issue number 1-2
Start page 119
End page 131
Publisher Emerald
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2004
ISSN 0955-6222
1758-5953
Summary This study has focussed on three main areas. First, an evaluation of the physical attributes of cashmere tops available to commercial spinners; second, the influence of processing variables on the efficiency of producing cashmere tops from raw Australian cashmere; and third, the influence of design of cashmere ultrafine wool blends on the fibre curvature of tops. Testing the physical attributes of cashmere tops from traditional and new sources of supply, was followed by statistical analyses based on factors of origin, processor and other determinants. The analyses demonstrated important processor effects and also that cashmere from different origins shows commercially important variations in fibre attributes. It was possible to efficiently produce Australian cashmere tops with Hauteur, tenacity, extension, softness and residual guard hairs quality attributes equivalent to those observed in the best cashmere tops. The blending of cashmere with wool resulted in a reduction of the mean fibre curvature of the blend compared with the unblended wool. The present work demonstrated that the fibre curvature properties of blended low crimp ultrafine wool tops were closer to the properties of pure cashmere tops than were tops made from blended standard high crimp ultrafine wool. The attributes of textiles made from the relatively rare Australian low curvature cashmere could enhance the marketability of both Australian cashmere and low curvature wool.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/09556220410520414
Field of Research 091012 Textile Technology
Socio Economic Objective 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, Emerald
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30024588

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.