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The effects of phonological and morphological training on speech perception scores and grammatical judgments in deaf and hard-of-hearing children

Bow, Catherine P., Blamey, Peter J., Paatsch, Louise E. and Sarant, Julia Z. 2004, The effects of phonological and morphological training on speech perception scores and grammatical judgments in deaf and hard-of-hearing children, Journal of deaf studies and deaf education, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 305-314, doi: 10.1093/deafed/enh032.

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Title The effects of phonological and morphological training on speech perception scores and grammatical judgments in deaf and hard-of-hearing children
Author(s) Bow, Catherine P.
Blamey, Peter J.
Paatsch, Louise E.ORCID iD for Paatsch, Louise E. orcid.org/0000-0003-3978-9603
Sarant, Julia Z.
Journal name Journal of deaf studies and deaf education
Volume number 9
Issue number 3
Start page 305
End page 314
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Cary, N.C.
Publication date 2004-06
ISSN 1081-4159
1465-7325
Summary Seventeen primary school deaf and hard-of-hearing children were given two types of training for 9 weeks each. Phonological training involved practice of /s, z, t, d/ in word final position in monomorphemic words. Morphological training involved learning and practicing the rules for forming third-person singular, present tense, past tense, and plurals. The words used in the two training types were different (monomorphemic or polymorphemic) but both involved word final /s, z, t, d/. Grammatical judgments were tested before and after training using short sentences that were read aloud by the child (or by the presenter if the child was unable to read them). Perception was tested with 150 key words in sentences using the trained morphemes and phonemes in word final position. Grammatical judgments for sentences involving the trained morphemes improved significantly after each type of training. Both types of training needed to be completed before a significant improvement was found for speech perception scores. The results suggest that both phonological and morphological training are beneficial in improving speech perception and grammatical performance of deaf and hard-of-hearing children and that both types of training were required to obtain the maximum benefit.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/deafed/enh032
Field of Research 130312 Special Education and Disability
Socio Economic Objective 939907 Special Needs Education
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, Oxford University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30024866

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Education
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