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Separating the contributions of hearing, lexical knowledge and speech production to speech perception scores in children with hearing impairments.

Paatsch, Louise, Blamey, Peter, Sarant, Julia, Martin, Lois and Bow, Catherine 2004, Separating the contributions of hearing, lexical knowledge and speech production to speech perception scores in children with hearing impairments., Journal of speech, language and hearing research, vol. 47, no. 4, pp. 738-750, doi: 10.1044/1092-4388(2004/056).

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Title Separating the contributions of hearing, lexical knowledge and speech production to speech perception scores in children with hearing impairments.
Author(s) Paatsch, LouiseORCID iD for Paatsch, Louise orcid.org/0000-0003-3978-9603
Blamey, Peter
Sarant, Julia
Martin, Lois
Bow, Catherine
Journal name Journal of speech, language and hearing research
Volume number 47
Issue number 4
Start page 738
End page 750
Publisher American Speech - Language - Hearing Association
Place of publication Rockville, Maryland
Publication date 2004-08
ISSN 1092-4388
1558-9102
Keyword(s) speech perception
hearing impairment
speech production
lexical knowledge
Summary Open-set word and sentence speech-perception test scores are commonly used as a measure of hearing abilities in children and adults using cochlear implants and/or hearing aids. These tests are usually presented auditorily with a verbal response. In the case of children, scores are typically lower and more variable than for adults with hearing impairments using similar devices. It is difficult to interpret children's speech-perception scores without considering the effects of lexical knowledge and speech-production abilities on their responses. This study postulated a simple mathematical model to describe the effects of hearing, lexical knowledge, and speech production on the perception test scores for monosyllabic words by children with impaired hearing. Thirty-three primary-school children with impaired hearing, fitted with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants, were evaluated using speech-perception, reading-aloud, speech-production, and language measures. These various measures were incorporated in the mathematical model, which revealed that performance in an open-set word-perception test in the auditory-alone mode is strongly dependent on residual hearing levels, lexical knowledge, and speech-production abilities. Further applications of the model provided an estimate of the effect of each component on the overall speech-perception score for each child.
Language eng
DOI 10.1044/1092-4388(2004/056)
Field of Research 130312 Special Education and Disability
Socio Economic Objective 939907 Special Needs Education
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30024869

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Education
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Created: Thu, 04 Mar 2010, 14:23:31 EST by Kylie Koulkoudinas

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