You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Variations in vascular access flows in haemodialysis can depend on needle orientation

Schoch, M., Wilson, S. and Agar, J. W. M. 2008, Variations in vascular access flows in haemodialysis can depend on needle orientation, Renal Society of Australasia journal, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 13-18.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
schoch-variationsinvascular-2008.pdf Published version application/pdf 112.83KB 212

Title Variations in vascular access flows in haemodialysis can depend on needle orientation
Author(s) Schoch, M.
Wilson, S.
Agar, J. W. M.
Journal name Renal Society of Australasia journal
Volume number 4
Issue number 2
Start page 13
End page 18
Total pages 6
Publisher Renal Society of Australasia
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2008-07
ISSN 1832-3804
Summary Introduction: While using the Transonic Qc[TM] machine to assess access flow in arteriovenous fistulae (AVF), we observed that when compared to antegrade arterial needle insertion, retrograde arterial needle insertion could regularly produce lower access flow measurements. This study sought to explore this phenomenon.

Method: 23 patients entered and 20 finished the study. Patient selection criteria included: functioning AVF and an adequate AVF length for either retrograde or antegrade arterial needle insertion. After ensuring stable and similar blood pressures, 3 flow measurements were taken during the first 2 hours on the same dialysis day of 3 consecutive weeks using antegrade needle insertion then were repeated on 3 further consecutive weeks using retrograde insertion.

Results: Overall, access flows measured with retrograde insertion were significantly lower by a mean difference of 107.15 ml/min (57-484 ml/min) than the flows measured with antegrade needle placement. In 5/20, 3 recorded minimal difference and 2 had a higher access flows during retrograde insertion. No recirculation was observed during either antegrade or retrograde needle insertion. The paired t-test showed that there was significant difference between the antegrade versus retrograde mean measurements (p = 0.005).

Conclusion: Although the sample size is small and the number of measurements limited, we conclude that access flows may be greater with an antegrade arterial orientation compared to flows recorded with a retrograde orientation. The phenomenon behind this conclusion is yet to be investigated. We suggest that when using the Transonic Qc[TM] access measurement device the arterial needle should always be in the same direction for each measurement for each individual patient.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner
Language eng
Field of Research 110312 Nephrology and Urology
Socio Economic Objective 920203 Diagnostic Methods
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Renal Society of Australasia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30024896

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 611 Abstract Views, 212 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 05 Mar 2010, 09:40:11 EST by Sally Morrigan

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.