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Assessing the intake of obesity-related foods and beverages in young children: comparison of a simple population survey with 24 hr-recall

Bennett, Cheryl-Ann, de Silva-Sanigorski, Andrea M, Nichols, Melanie, Bell, Andrew C and Swinburn, Boyd A. 2009, Assessing the intake of obesity-related foods and beverages in young children: comparison of a simple population survey with 24 hr-recall, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 6, no. Article 71, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-6-71.

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Title Assessing the intake of obesity-related foods and beverages in young children: comparison of a simple population survey with 24 hr-recall
Author(s) Bennett, Cheryl-Ann
de Silva-Sanigorski, Andrea M
Nichols, MelanieORCID iD for Nichols, Melanie orcid.org/0000-0002-7834-5899
Bell, Andrew CORCID iD for Bell, Andrew C orcid.org/0000-0003-2731-9858
Swinburn, Boyd A.
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 6
Issue number Article 71
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2009-10-26
ISSN 1479-5868
Summary Background: With an increasing focus on obesity prevention there is a need for simple, valid tools to assess dietary indicators that may be the targets of  intervention programs. The objective of this study was to determine the relative  validity of previous day dietary intake using a newly developed parent-proxy  questionnaire (EPAQ) for two to five year old children.

Methods: A convenience sample of participants (n = 90) recruited through preschools and the community in Geelong, Australia provided dietary data for their child via EPAQ and interviewer administered 24-hour dietary recall (24 hr-recall). Comparison of mean food and beverage group servings between the  EPAQ and 24 hr-recall was conducted and Spearman rank correlations were computed to examine the association between the two methods.

Results
: Mean servings of food/beverage groups were comparable between methods for all groups except water, and significant correlations were found between the servings of food and beverages using the EPAQ and 24-hr recall methods (ranging from 0.57 to 0.88).

Conclusion
: The EPAQ is a simple and useful population-level tool for  estimating the intake of obesity-related foods and beverages in children aged two to five years. When compared with 24-hour recall data, the EPAQ produced an acceptable level of relative validity and this short survey has application for population monitoring and the evaluation of population-based obesity prevention interventions for young children.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-6-71
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Bennett et al
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30024903

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.