You are not logged in.

Ecological and life-history factors influencing the evolution of maternal antibody allocation : a phylogenetic comparison

Addison, BriAnne, Klasing, Kirk C., Robinson, W. Douglas, Austin, Suzanne H. and Ricklefs, Robert E. 2009, Ecological and life-history factors influencing the evolution of maternal antibody allocation : a phylogenetic comparison, Proceedings of the Royal Society B-biological sciences, vol. 276, no. 1675, pp. 3979-3987, doi: 10.1098/rspb.2009.1296.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Ecological and life-history factors influencing the evolution of maternal antibody allocation : a phylogenetic comparison
Author(s) Addison, BriAnne
Klasing, Kirk C.
Robinson, W. Douglas
Austin, Suzanne H.
Ricklefs, Robert E.
Journal name Proceedings of the Royal Society B-biological sciences
Volume number 276
Issue number 1675
Start page 3979
End page 3987
Publisher The Royal Society
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2009-11-22
ISSN 0962-8452
1471-2954
Summary Maternally derived yolk antibodies provide neonates with immune protection in early life at negligible cost to mothers. However, developmental effects on the neonate's future immunity are potentially costly and thus could limit yolk antibody deposition. The benefits to neonatal immunity must be balanced against costs, which may depend on neonate vulnerability to pathogens, developmental trajectories and the immunological strategies best suited to a species' pace of life. We measured yolk antibodies and life-history features of 23 species of small Neotropical birds and assessed the evidence for each of several hypotheses for life history and ecological effects on the evolution of yolk antibody levels. Developmental period and yolk antibodies are negatively related, which possibly reflect the importance of humoral immune priming through antigen exposure, and selection to avoid autoimmunity, in species with a slower pace of life. There is also a strong relationship between body size and yolk antibody concentration, suggesting that larger species are architecturally equipped to produce and transfer higher concentrations of antibodies. These results suggest that developmental effects of maternally derived antibodies, such as imprinting effects on B-cell diversity or autoimmune effects, are important and deserve more consideration in future research.
Language eng
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2009.1296
Field of Research 060308 Life Histories
060406 Genetic Immunology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, The Royal Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30024934

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 16 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 17 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 387 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 08 Mar 2010, 13:31:18 EST by Brianne Addison

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.