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Using building adaptation to deliver sustainability in Australia

Wilkinson, Sara, Reed, Richard and James, Kimberley 2009, Using building adaptation to deliver sustainability in Australia, Structural survey, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 46-61.

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Title Using building adaptation to deliver sustainability in Australia
Author(s) Wilkinson, Sara
Reed, Richard
James, Kimberley
Journal name Structural survey
Volume number 27
Issue number 1
Start page 46
End page 61
Total pages 16
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2009
ISSN 0263-080X
1758-6844
Keyword(s) buildings
regeneration
sustainable development
urban areas
office buildings
Australia
Summary Purpose – This paper seeks to establish the rationale for existing office building adaptation within Melbourne, Australia, as the city strives to become carbon neutral by 2020. The problems faced by policy makers to determine which buildings have the optimum adaptation potential are to be identified and discussed.

Design/methodology/approach – This research adopts the approach of creating a database of all the buildings in the Melbourne CBD including details of physical, social, economic and technological attributes. This approach will determine whether relationships exist between attributes and the frequency of building adaptation or whether triggers to adaptation can be determined.

Findings – This research provided evidence that a much faster rate of office building adaptation is necessary to meet the targets already set for carbon neutrality. The findings demonstrate that a retrospective comprehensive examination of previous adaptation in the CBD is a unique and original approach to determining the building characteristics associated with adaptation and whether triggers can be identified based on previous practices. The implication is that a decision-making tool should be developed to allow policy makers to target sectors of the office building stock to deliver carbon neutrality within the 2020 timeframe.

Practical implications – Drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are required to mitigate global warming and climate change and all stakeholders should be looking at ways of reducing emissions from existing stock.

Originality/value
– This paper adds to the existing body of knowledge by raising awareness of the way in which the adaptation of large amounts of existing stock can be fast tracked to mitigate the impact of climate change and warming associated with the built environment, and in addition it establishes a framework for a decision-making tool for policy makers.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 961208 Rehabilitation of Degraded Urban and Industrial Environments
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Emerald Group Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30024952

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.