Metabolic adaptations to short-term high-intensity interval training : a little pain for a lot of gain?

Gibala, Martin J. and McGee, Sean L. 2008, Metabolic adaptations to short-term high-intensity interval training : a little pain for a lot of gain?, Exercise and sport sciences reviews, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 58-63.


Title Metabolic adaptations to short-term high-intensity interval training : a little pain for a lot of gain?
Author(s) Gibala, Martin J.
McGee, Sean L.
Journal name Exercise and sport sciences reviews
Volume number 36
Issue number 2
Start page 58
End page 63
Publisher Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2008-04
ISSN 0091-6331
1538-3008
Summary High-intensity interval training (HIT) is a potent time-efficient strategy to induce numerous metabolic adaptations usually associated with traditional endurance training. As little as six sessions of HIT over 2 wk or a total of only approximately 15 min of very intense exercise (~600 kJ), can increase skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and endurance performance and alter metabolic control during aerobic-based exercise.
Language eng
Field of Research 060114 Systems Biology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30025026

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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Created: Fri, 12 Mar 2010, 11:31:44 EST by Sean McGee

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