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Examining how teachers use web 2.0 technologies in Science lessons to promote higher order thinking in teaching science

Chittleborough, Gail, Jobling, Wendy, Haslam, Filocha, Hubber, Peter and Calnin, Gerard 2009, Examining how teachers use web 2.0 technologies in Science lessons to promote higher order thinking in teaching science, in NARST 2009 : 2009 Annual International Conference : Grand Challenges and Great Opportunities in Science Education, National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Reston, Va., pp. 1-13.

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Title Examining how teachers use web 2.0 technologies in Science lessons to promote higher order thinking in teaching science
Author(s) Chittleborough, Gail
Jobling, Wendy
Haslam, Filocha
Hubber, Peter
Calnin, Gerard
Conference name National Association for Research in Science Teaching Conference (2009 : Garden Grove, California)
Conference location Garden Grove, California
Conference dates 17 - 21 April 2009
Title of proceedings NARST 2009 : 2009 Annual International Conference : Grand Challenges and Great Opportunities in Science Education
Editor(s) [Unknown],
Publication date 2009
Conference series National Association for Research in Science Teaching Conference
Start page 1
End page 13
Publisher National Association for Research in Science Teaching
Place of publication Reston, Va.
Summary During 2007 several independent Victorian secondary schools participated in a study exploring the ways in which the use of learning technologies can support the development of higher order thinking skills for students. This paper focuses on the use of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) including Web 2.0 technologies for promoting effective teaching and learning in science. A case study methodology was used to describe how individual teachers used ICT and Web 2.0 in their settings. Data included interviews (focus group and individual), questionnaires, monitoring of teacher and student use of smart tools, analysis of curriculum documents and delivery methods and of student work samples. The evaluation used an interpretive methodology to investigate five research areas'. Higher-order thinking, Metacognitive awareness, Team work/collaboration, Affect towards school/learning and Ownership of learning. Three cases are reported on in this paper. Each describes how student engagement and learning increased and how teachers' attitudes and skills developed. Examples of student and teacher blogs are provided to illustrate how such technologies encourage  students and teachers to look beyond text science.
Language eng
Field of Research 130212 Science, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 930102 Learner and Learning Processes
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2009, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30025041

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.